Hooker's Journal of Botany and Kew Garden Miscellany, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Sir William Jackson Hooker
Reeve, Benham, and Reeve, 1850 - Botany
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Page 168 - ... feet eight inches to five feet rather broad in the chest, and with muscular arms, but small hands and slender wrists.* The face is broad, flat, and of eminently Tartar character, flat-nosed and oblique-eyed, with no beard, and little moustache ; the complexion is sallow, or often a clear olive ; the hair is collected into an immense tail, plaited flat or round. The lower limbs are powerfully developed, befitting genuine mountaineers : the feet are small. Though never really handsome, and...
Page 175 - ... have seen flowers uniting the characters of Victoria Regia and Cruziana (of the latter I have only the brief description in Walpers), so that I can hardly doubt their being the same species as had been already more than suspected. The igarape, where we gathered the Victoria, is called Tapiruari. I had two flowers brought to me, a few days afterwards, from the adjacent lake, which seems to have no name but that of the sitios on its banks. Mr Jeffreys has also brought me flowers from the Rio Arrapixuna,...
Page 352 - ... is the number of brownish wart-like bodies that stud the young shoots and occasionally the margins on the underside of the leaves. Each of these warts or scales is a transformed female, containing a large number of eggs which are hatched within it. When the young ones come out from their nest, they run about over the plant looking very much like diminutive woodlice, and at this period there is no apparent distinction between male and female. Shortly after being hatched the males seek the underside...
Page 170 - I have often listened with real pleasure to the simple music of this rude instrument; its low and sweet tones are singularly JEolian, as are the airs usually played, which fall by octaves: it seems to harmonize with the solitude of their primaeval forests, and he must have a dull ear who cannot draw from it the indication of a contented mind, whether he may relish its soft musical notes or not.
Page 173 - ... feet deeper than at present, while its breadth will also be greatly increased, so that the petioles of the Victoria, lengthening, doubtless, with the rise of the waters, will bring the leaves to a much greater surface, on which they will have room to dilate to about twice their present size. The aspect of the Victoria, in its native waters, is so new and extraordinary, that I am at a loss to what to compare it. The image is not a very poetical one, but assuredly the impression the plant gave...
Page 170 - ... person and service. A gloomy-tempered or morose master they avoid, an unkind one they flee. If they serve a good hills-man like themselves, they will follow him with alacrity, sleep on the cold, bleak mountain exposed to the pitiless rain, without a murmur, lay down the heavy burden to carry their master over a stream, or give him a helping hand up a rock or precipice do anything, in short, but encounter a foe, for I believe the Lepcha to be a veritable coward...
Page 173 - We reached the igarape, and were at once gratified by seeing the Victoria growing by the opposite shore of the igarape itself. We were warned by the people not to go amongst the plants, as their prickles were venomous : but I got both hands and feet considerably pricked without experiencing any ill effects. We were fortunate in finding the plant in good flower, but, according to the testimony of all at Santarem who have seen it, the leaves attain their greatest dimensions in the winter. Captain Hislop...
Page 355 - ... fall off before coming to . maturity ; the general health of the tree also begins to fail, and it acquires a blighted appearance. A loss of crop is this year sustained, but to no great extent. The third year brings about a more serious change; the whole plant acquires a black hue, appearing as if soot had been thrown over it in great quantities. This is caused by the growth of a parasitic...
Page 168 - They are of short stature four feet eight inches to five feet rather broad in the chest, and with muscular arms, but small hands and slender wrists. The face is broad, flat, and of eminently Tartar character, flat-nosed and oblique-eyed, with no beard, and little moustache ; the complexion is sallow, or often a clear olive ; the hair is collected into an immense tail, plaited flat or round. The lower limbs are powerfully developed, befitting genuine mountaineers : the feet are small. Though...
Page 88 - ... fabrics, being extensively used for those purposes in Dundee. But it is not suitable for cordage and other articles into which hemp is manufactured, from its snapping when twisted, and rotting in water. The quantities imported and the prices have fluctuated very greatly during the last dozen years; but from Л 2 to 15 a ton ap|>ears to be a fair average.

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