The Associative Processes of the Guinea Pig: A Study of the Psychical Development of an Animal with a Nervous System Well Medullated at Birth ... (Google eBook)

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University of Chicago, 1904 - Animal intelligence - 67 pages
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Page 48 - He has never seen an object and remembers nothing. The guinea pig at that age has triumphantly recalled a complex path at the end of which he sits eating his well-deserved carrot. At twenty-three days the rat is lifting latches neatly, and forming what Hobhouse calls practical judgments...
Page 33 - I II III IV V VI VII VIM IX X XI XII...
Page 6 - ... the practical judgment," and the "practical idea." By a practical idea is meant "the function which directs action, not necessarily in accord with habit or instinct, to the production of a certain perceptible result. It is further a necessary part of such an idea that it rests on a perceptual basis, and is capable of being brought into relation with another such idea, for example, as means to end.
Page 48 - When the guinea pig has forced his way through a labyrinth, he has reached the end of his psychical powers. He cannot pull a latch nor push a bolt; he will not depress an inclined plane, chew a string, nor stamp his foot. . . . The experience of the white rat extends to strange combinations of wires and springs, and all the delightful surprises revealed by secret doors. But when the guinea pig has turned the proper number of corners, his dinner must be waiting for him or he does not...
Page 17 - ... later. Development varies greatly in individuals. It seems true without doubt that the larger the guinea pig at birth the more active it is, and the sooner it reaches full coordination and the ability to solve problems presented to it (problems which depend upon activity). From MINOT'S observations1 it was concluded that the length of gestation is shorter the larger the litter, and the shorter the gestation the smaller the litter. Therefore it is probable that variation in activity and development...
Page 46 - ... Sensitive around the mouth, otherwise dull. Sensitive at birth. Present, but no differentiation between pleasant and unpleasant. Naked, ill-developed, immature in form and musculature. Random movements : increase in number from 2 to 8 days. About constant throughout maturity. , Psychical Development. Movement very slight and weak at birth, and does not attain vigor until fifth day. The few movements attempted are coordinated, and after learning to crawl (from 4th day) coordination rapidly •increased....
Page 21 - It still scratched and gnawed at the old place, but failing to get out, set out on an 'exploring tour. In 1.33 min. it had found the door. It then ran around the box in the direction of the arrows to get out at y, but found itself shut off there. It began to look again, and in .58 min. had found the opening at s. Total time, 2.083 min. Replaced in A (Text-fig. 4). The guinea pig sat perfectly still for 1.91 min. Then it turned around and pushed gently at the point where the door had been in the first...
Page 35 - I. The guinea pig can learn a complex path to food. II. The time curve for learning is very abrupt for the adult, and for any one individual is also irregular. It tends, however, to reach a minimum at which point it is, after a few trials, nearly constant. In the labyrinth used this minimum will be observed to be .166 min. III. The curve for elimination of random movements follows very closely the time curve, as random movements necessarily increase the time required. IV. There are two kinds of random...
Page 44 - ... experimental cage to change still more the tactual conditions. The electric wire was attached to the door to make Contact when the door should be pushed open. The guinea pig was then brought to the dark room. Aug. 22. Time 1.75 min. In order to test whether this time was accidental another trial was given. Repeated. Time .75 min. One would hesitate to lay much stress on the guinea pig's sense of touch in comparison, eg , with that of the white rat, because of the difference in the vibrissae....
Page 4 - DELBOEUF" has observed lizards in captivity and finds that they differ in disposition and intelligence. They can remember people and places, and they seem to possess the higher emotions as fear, love, jealousy. 1 RM VERKES and GURRY E.

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