Supplements to the Revised Statutes: General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; Passed Subsequently to the Revised Statutes, [1836-1859] ... The Supplements, from 1836 to 1843, Inclusive, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Theron Metcalf, Horace Mann, Luther Stearns Cushing, Horace Gray
Dutton & Wentworth, 1844 - Law
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Page xvii - In the government of this Commonwealth, the legislative department shall never exercise the executive and judicial powers, or either of them : the executive shall never exercise the legislative and judicial powers, or either of them : the judicial shall never exercise the legislative and executive powers,, or either of them : to the end it may be a government of laws and not of men.
Page xiv - Every subject of the Commonwealth ought to find a certain remedy, by having recourse to the laws, for all injuries or wrongs which he may receive in his person, property or character. He ought to obtain right and justice freely, and without being obliged to purchase it ; completely, and without any denial ; promptly, and without delay, conformably to the laws.
Page xi - The body politic is formed by a voluntary association of individuals; it is a social compact by which the whole people covenants with each citizen and each citizen with the whole people that all shall be governed by certain laws for the common good.
Page xvii - It is essential to the preservation of the rights of every individual, his life, liberty, property, and character, that there be an impartial interpretation of the laws, and administration of justice. It is the right of every citizen to be tried by judges as free, impartial, and independent as the lot of humanity will admit.
Page xii - And no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping GOD in the manner and season most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience; or for his religious profession of sentiments; provided he doth not disturb the public peace, or obstruct others in their religious worship.
Page xi - We, therefore, the people of Massachusetts, acknowledging, with grateful hearts, the goodness of the great Legislator of the universe, in affording us, in the course of his providence, an opportunity, deliberately and peaceably, without fraud, violence or surprise, of entering into an original, explicit and solemn compact with each other...
Page xl - I do solemnly swear that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich; and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge all the duties incumbent on me as , according to the best of my abilities and understanding agreeably to the Constitution and laws of the United States.
Page xlii - All the laws, which have heretofore been adopted, used, and approved in the province, colony or state of Massachusetts Bay, and usually practised on in the courts of law, shall still remain and be in full force until altered or repealed by the legislature ; such parts only excepted as are repugnant to the rights and liberties contained in this constitution.
Page xxxix - College; provided, that nothing herein shall be construed to prevent the legislature of this commonwealth from making such alterations in the government of the said university, as shall be conducive to its advantage, and the interest of the republic of letters, in as full a manner as might have been done by the legislature of the late Province of the Massachusetts Bay.
Page xliii - Representatives, and who shall have paid, by himself, or his parent, master, or guardian, any State or county tax, which shall, within two years next preceding such election, have been assessed upon him, in any town or district of this Commonwealth ; and also, every citizen who shall be by law exempted from taxation, and who shall be in all other respects qualified as above mentioned...

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