The Psychology of Music

Front Cover
Diana Deutsch
Gulf Professional Publishing, 1999 - Psychology - 807 pages
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The aim of the psychology of music is to understand musical phenomena in terms of mental functions--to characterize the ways in which one perceives, remembers, creates, and performs music. Since the First Edition of The Psychology of Music was published the field has emerged from an interdisciplinary curiosity into a fully ramified subdiscipline of psychology due to several factors. The opportunity to generate, analyze, and transform sounds by computer is no longer limited to a few researchers with access to large multi-user facilities, but rather is available to individual investigators on a widespread basis. Second, dramatic advances in the field of neuroscience have profoundly influenced thinking about the way that music is processed in the brain. Third, collaborations between psychologists and musicians, which were evolving at the time the First Edition was written, are now quite common; to a large extent now speaking a common language and agreeing on basic philosophical issues.
The Psychology of Music, Second Edition has been completely revised to bring the reader the most up-to-date information, additional subject matter, and new contributors to incorporate all of these important variables.
  

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Contents

THE NATURE OF MUSICAL SOUND JOHN R PIERCE I Musical Sound
1
From Classical Times
2
Mersenne and Galileo
3
Time Resolution and Musical Sounds
5
Externalization
6
Spectra
7
Spectra and Sound
8
Resonance and Musical Instruments
10
Natural Intervals and Scales
240
8
265
Stability of the Interval Standard
280
Colored Hearing
286
9
299
Larger Scale Groupings
313
EqualInterval Tone Complexes
336
1
413

Complexity of Periodic Sounds
11
Helmholtz Plomp and Dissonance
12
Pitch
13
QuasiMusical and Unmusical Sounds
16
Descriptions of Musical Sounds
17
Acknowledgments
20
Rudolf Rasch 89 University of Utrecht Utrecht The Netherlands
21
n The Physical Problem
26
The Subjective Problem
33
Multipurpose Halls
44
Weinberger 47 Department of Psychobiology and Center
47
Experimental Approaches in the Neurobiology of Music
60
Harmony Consonance
67
Rhythm Temporal Coding
75
4
89
Perceptual Attributes of Simultaneous Tones
102
Conclusion
108
EXPLORATION OF TIMBRE BY ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS JEANCLAUDE RISSET AND DAVID L WESSEL I Timbre
113
The Classical View
114
The Shortcomings of the Classical Conception
116
Attack Transients
117
Importance of Characteristic Features
118
Percussion Instruments
124
CrossSynthesis and Voice Synthesis
126
Subtractive Synthesis
128
Global or Nonlinear Synthesis
130
Physical Modeling as a Synthesis Technique
131
Sampling
134
Musical Prosody Fusion and Segregation
135
AnalysisSynthesis as Fitting Physical and Perceptual Models to Data
138
The Use of AnalysisSynthesis Models of Timbre
141
Timbral Space
146
Conclusion
149
Appendices
151
References
158
THE PERCEPTION OF SINGING JOHAN SuNDBERG I Introduction
171
Function of the Voice
172
Resonatory Aspects
174
Phonation
188
Aspects of Voice Timbre
194
Vibrato
195
Pitch in Practice
203
Expression
207
Concluding Remarks
209
References
210
Burns 215 Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences
215
Musical Interval Perception
219
12
441
Problems with Level Displays
448
The Parametric Nature of Hierarchical Style Structures
451
Style Structures as Composite Cognitive Paths
456
Refining Further Hierarchical Displays
457
A Speculation
460
The Musical Reality of StyleStructural Hierarchies
464
Archetypes
466
The Limits of Style
468
References
471
Rhythm and Timing in Music Eric F Clarke I Introduction
473
Form Perception
476
Rhythm Perception
478
Timing in Music
489
Rhythm Timing and Movement
494
Summary
496
Acknowledgments
497
The Performance of Music Alf Gabrielsson I Introduction
501
Performance Planning
502
SightReading
509
Improvisation
513
Feedback in Performance
515
Motor Processes in Performance
516
Measurements of Performance
523
Models of Music Performance
550
Physical Factors in Performance
557
Psychological and Social Factors
561
Performance Evaluation
577
15
603
Summary
620
16
627
Music Ability and Other Abilities
643
17
653
Auditory Agnosias and Verbal Deafness
667
Progress in the Classification of Auditory Disorders
673
Progress in the Neuropsychology of Human Music Perception
699
Music Perception as a Skill
704
8
718
Comparative Music Perception and Cognition
725
Pitch Systems
736
Tonality
743
Rhythm
758
Creativity Communication Meaning and Affect
765
Perception of Tonality by the Monkey
776
Index
793
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About the author (1999)

deutsch is professor of psychology at the university of california, san diego.

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