Waiting for Anya

Front Cover
Puffin Books, Jan 1, 1997 - Juvenile Fiction - 176 pages
20 Reviews
One boy wins the support of his small French town and even a German soldier to help Jewish children escape, in a story of courage set in France during the Second World War.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
6
4 stars
10
3 stars
4
2 stars
0
1 star
0

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I really enjoyed this story, an exciting and moving book about a boy who becomes involved with the French resistance. Jo helps young Jewish children escape over the mountains to Spain. It is a story of courage, friendship and strength and has a sad and happy ending. It is a story to remember and read time and time again.  

Review: Waiting for Anya

User Review  - Dee Cameron - Goodreads

An outstanding tribute to the Jews and all the HEROES that risked their lives to do the RIGHT thing and save the JEWS from a certain untimely death during those most terrifying of times, The Holocaust of the Second Great War! Read full review

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
21
Section 3
36
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1997)

British author Michael Morpurgo was born in St. Albans, Hertforshire in 1943. He attended the University of London and studied English and French. He became a primary school teacher in Kent for about ten years. He and his wife Clare started a charity called Farms for City Children. They currently own three farms where over 2000 children a year stay for a week and experience the countryside by taking part in purposeful farmwork. He has published over 100 books and several screenplays. He won the 1995 Whitbread Children's Book Award for The Wreck of the Zanzibar, the 1996 Nestle Smarties Book Prize for The Butterfly Lion, and the 2000 Children's Book Award for Kensuke's Kingdom. Private Peaceful won the 2005 Red House Children's Book Award and the Blue Peter Book of the Year Award. Five of his books have been made into movies and two have been adapted for television. He was named as the third Children's Laureate in May 2003.

Bibliographic information