Girls and Women in Classical Greek Religion

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2002 - Religion - 436 pages
0 Reviews
Throughout history women have always played an important role in religious activities although individual cultures have dictated the nature and significance of this role. Classical Greek religion is no exception and both the iconography and literary evidence suggests a prominent position for women and girls in ritual and cultic activity. Drawing on both sources of evidence, as well as inscriptions, Matthew Dillon presents an insightful study of the subject exploring the private religious duties that women performed, how public piety was displayed, how women became priests, female religious patrons, women-only festivals and so on. Dillon examines evidence for the role of girls in religious ritual with their untainted hands making them ideal carriers of jugs, bowls and incense-bearers as well as carrying out other temple duties. The worship of non-mainstream deities, the role of marginal women such as slave women, foreigners and prostitutes, are also examined.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

WOMEN AS DEDICATORS
9
THE PUBLIC RELIGIOUS ROLES OF GIRLS AND ADOLESCENT WOMEN IN ATHENS
37
WOMEN PRIESTS
73
SEGREGATED AND ECSTATIC RELIGIOUS RITES
107
WOMENONLY FESTIVALS
109
WOMEN AT THE MARGINS OF GREEK RELIGION
139
PROSTITUTES FOREIGN WOMEN AND THE GODS
183
SACRIFICIAL AND DOMESTIC RITUALS
209
WOMEN SACRIFICE AND IMPURITY
236
WOMEN AND THE CORPSE Mourning rituals
268
EPILOGUE
293
NOTES
301
GLOSSARY
369
ABBREVIATIONS
372
BIBLIOGRAPHY
380
INDEX
403

FROM ADOLESCENT GIRL TO WOMAN WIFE AND MOTHER
211

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information