American Lutheranism: Friedrich Bente, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Concordia Publishing House, 1919 - Lutheran Church
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 232 - And it was given unto him to make war with the saints, and to overcome them : and power was given him over all kindreds, and tongues, and nations.
Page 192 - Whose mouths must be stopped, who subvert whole houses, teaching things which they ought not, for filthy lucre's sake.
Page 189 - For every one that doeth evil hateth the light, and cometh not to the light, lest his works should be reproved. But he that doeth the truth cometh to the light, that his works may be made manifest, that they have been wrought in God.
Page 51 - Europe there are many oppressed for conscience sake; and here there are those oppressed which are of a black colour.
Page 50 - Is there any that would be done or handled at this manner? viz., to be sold or made a slave for all the time of his life?
Page 208 - Do ye not know that the saints shall judge the world? and if the world shall be judged by you, are ye unworthy to judge the smallest matters? Know ye not that we shall judge Angels? how much more things that pertain to this life...
Page 51 - Quakers do here handel men as they handel there the cattle. And for that reason some have no mind or inclination to come hither.
Page 52 - Quakers do rule in their province; and most of them do look upon us with an envious eye. But if this is done well, what shall we say is done evil?
Page 51 - And we who profess that it is not lawful to steal, must, likewise, avoid to purchase such things as are stolen, but rather help to stop this robbing and stealing, if possible.
Page 31 - The French commander announced to near half a million of human beings that he granted them three days of grace, and that, within that time, they must shift for themselves. Soon the roads and fields, which then lay deep in snow, were blackened by innumerable multitudes of men, women, and children flying from their homes. Many died of cold and hunger ; but enough survived to fill the streets of all the cities of Europe with lean and squalid beggars, who had once been shriving farmers and shopkeepers.

Bibliographic information