Unhinged: The Trouble with Psychiatry - A Doctor's Revelations about a Profession in Crisis (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, May 18, 2010 - Psychology - 272 pages
19 Reviews
IN THIS STIRRING AND BEAUTIFULLY WRITTEN WAKE-UP CALL, psychiatrist Daniel Carlat exposes deeply disturbing problems plaguing his profession, revealing the ways it has abandoned its essential purpose: to understand the mind, so that psychiatrists can heal mental illness and not just treat symptoms. As he did in his hard-hitting and widely read New York Times Magazine article "Dr. Drug Rep," and as he continues to do in his popular watchdog newsletter, The Carlat Psychiatry Report, he writes with bracing honesty about how psychiatry has so largely forsaken the practice of talk therapy for the seductive—and more lucrative—practice of simply prescribing drugs, with a host of deeply troubling consequences.

Psychiatrists have settled for treating symptoms rather than causes, embracing the apparent medical rigor of DSM diagnoses and prescription in place of learning the more challenging craft of therapeutic counseling, gaining only limited understanding of their patients’ lives. Talk therapy takes time, whereas the fifteen-minute "med check" allows for more patients and more insurance company reimbursement. Yet DSM diagnoses, he shows, are premised on a good deal less science than we would think.

Writing from an insider’s perspective, with refreshing forthrightness about his own daily struggles as a practitioner, Dr. Carlat shares a wealth of stories from his own practice and those of others that demonstrate the glaring shortcomings of the standard fifteen-minute patient visit. He also reveals the dangers of rampant diagnoses of bipolar disorder, ADHD, and other "popular" psychiatric disorders, and exposes the risks of the cocktails of medications so many patients are put on. Especially disturbing are the terrible consequences of overprescription of drugs to children of ever younger ages. Taking us on a tour of the world of pharmaceutical marketing, he also reveals the inner workings of collusion between psychiatrists and drug companies.

Concluding with a road map for exactly how the profession should be reformed, Unhinged is vital reading for all those in treatment or considering it, as well as a stirring call to action for the large community of psychiatrists themselves. As physicians and drug companies continue to work together in disquieting and harmful ways, and as diagnoses—and misdiagnoses—of mental disorders skyrocket, it’s essential that Dr. Carlat’s bold call for reform is heeded.
  

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Review: Unhinged: The Trouble with Psychiatry - A Doctor's Revelations about a Profession in Crisis

User Review  - Jason - Goodreads

Dr. Carlat is a brave man. He makes some bold calls in this book and offers suggestions for improving the troubled field of psychiatry that are sure to get blood boiling in some circles. Psychiatrists ... Read full review

Review: Unhinged: The Trouble with Psychiatry - A Doctor's Revelations about a Profession in Crisis

User Review  - Diane - Goodreads

Very lucid, easy to read and provocative. I'll have to rethink my meds. Read full review

Contents

the trouble with Psychiatry
1
on Becoming a Psychiatrist
17
the Bible of Psychiatry
42
How Medications Became the new therapy
69
How Companies sell Psychiatrists on their Drugs
98
the Hired Guns
121
A Frenzy of Diagnosis
141
the seductions of technology
162
the Missing skill
189
solutions
207
notes
225
Acknowledgments
243
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Daniel J. Carlat is a professor of psychiatry who did his psychiatric training at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. He is assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston where he teaches medical students basic interviewing and therapy skills. He is Editor in Chief of The Carlat Psychiatry Report, a newsletter on psychopharmacology. He operates a blog The Carlat Psychiatry Blog which received an award for outstanding mental health journalism. He has also written articles for Psychology Today and The New York Times Magazine. Some books he has authored are The Psychiatric Interview: A Practical Guide and Trouble with Psychiatry.

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