Displacing Natives: The Rhetorical Production of Hawaiʻi

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jan 1, 1999 - History - 223 pages
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This insightful study examines the strategies used by outsiders to usurp Hawaiian lands and undermine indigenous Hawaiian culture. Drawing upon historical and contemporary examples, Houston Wood investigates the journals of Captain Cook, Hollywood films, commercialized hula, Waikiki development schemes, and the appropriation of Pele and Kilauea by haoles to explore how these diverse productions all displace Native culture. Yet, the author emphasizes the voices that have never been completely silenced and can be heard asserting themselves today through songs, chants, literature, the internet, and the Native nationalist sovereignty movement. This impassioned argument about the linkages between textual and physical displacements of Native Hawaiians will engage all readers interested in Pacific literature and postcolonial studies.
  

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Contents

The Violent Rhetoric of Names
9
Captain James Cook Rhetorician
21
The Kamaāina AntiConquest
37
Unwritable Knowledge
53
Displacing Three Hawaiian Places
62
Displacing Pele Hawaiis Volcanoes in a Contact Zone
63
Echo Tourism The Narrative of Nostalgia in Waikīkī
85
Safe Savagery Hollywoods Hawaii
103
Kahoolawe in Polyrhetoric and Monorhetoric
129
Hawaii in Cyberspace
151
Coda
165
Notes
171
Bibliography
199
Filmography
213
Index
215
About the Author
223

New Histories New Hopes
123
Polyrhetoric as Critical Traditionalism
127

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References to this book

Visual Consumption
Jonathan Schroeder
No preview available - 2002
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About the author (1999)

\Houston Wood spent many years as a macadamia nut farmer on the island of Hawaii. He is the coauthor of The Reality of Ethnomethodology and now teaches English at Hawaii Pacific University.

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