Poems (Google eBook)

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J. Munroe & Company, 1847 - 251 pages
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Contents

I
7
II
14
III
17
IV
21
V
25
VI
27
VII
30
VIII
36
XXXII
133
XXXIII
135
XXXIV
136
XXXV
141
XXXVI
144
XXXVII
147
XXXVIII
148
XXXIX
149

IX
41
X
43
XI
45
XII
48
XIII
51
XIV
53
XV
54
XVI
57
XVII
59
XVIII
60
XIX
64
XX
65
XXI
67
XXII
75
XXIII
94
XXIV
115
XXV
117
XXVI
123
XXVII
126
XXVIII
128
XXIX
129
XXX
130
XXXI
131
XL
150
XLI
151
XLII
156
XLIII
178
XLIV
180
XLV
185
XLVI
188
XLVII
192
XLVIII
194
XLIX
195
L
197
LI
206
LII
208
LIII
209
LIV
217
LV
219
LVI
221
LVII
223
LVIII
227
LIX
232
LX
236
LXI
250

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Page 250 - BY the rude bridge that arched the flood, Their flag to April's breeze unfurled, Here once the embattled farmers stood, And fired the shot heard round the world.
Page 72 - The timid it concerns to ask their way, And fear what foe in caves and swamps can stray, To make no step until the event is known, And ills to come as evils past bemoan. Not so the wise ; no coward watch he keeps To spy what danger on his pathway creeps ; Go where he will, the wise man is at home, His hearth the earth, his hall the azure dome ; Where his clear spirit leads him, there's his road, By God's own light illumined and foreshowed.
Page 141 - T is a brave master; Let it have scope: Follow it utterly, Hope beyond hope: High and more high It dives into noon, With wing unspent, Untold intent; But it is a god, Knows its own path And the outlets of the sky. It was never for the mean; It requireth courage stout. Souls above doubt, Valor unbending, It will reward,-- They shall return More than they were, And ever ascending.
Page 12 - In stings of remorse. Have I a lover Who is noble and free ? I would he were nobler Than to love me. " Eterne alternation Now follows, now flies ; And under pain, pleasure, Under pleasure, pain lies. ;/ *< Love works at the centre, Heart-heaving alway ; Forth speed the strong pulses To the borders of day. " Dull Sphinx, Jove keep thy five wits ; Thy sight is growing blear; Rue, myrrh and cummin for the Sphinx, __~- Her muddy eyes to clear...
Page 53 - Where are these men ? Asleep beneath their grounds And strangers, fond as they, their furrows plough. Earth laughs in flowers, to see her boastful boys Earth-proud, proud of the earth which is not theirs ; Who steer the plough, but cannot steer their feet Clear of the grave.
Page 138 - Olympian bards who sung Divine ideas below, Which always find us young, And always keep us so.
Page 29 - Or by knowledge grown too bright To hit the nerve of feebler sight. Straightway, a forgetting wind Stole over the celestial kind, And their lips the secret kept, If in ashes the fire-seed slept. But now and then, truth-speaking things Shamed the angels...
Page 120 - And ride mankind. There are two laws discrete, Not reconciled Law for man, and law for thing; The last builds town and fleet, But it runs wild, And doth the man unking.
Page 121 - Let man serve law for man; Live for friendship, live for love, For truth's and harmony's behoof; The state may follow how it can, As Olympus follows Jove.
Page 59 - Spreading its leafless blooms in a damp nook, To please the desert and the sluggish brook. The purple petals, fallen in the pool, Made the black water with their beauty gay; Here might the red-bird come his plumes to cool, And court the flower that cheapens his array. Rhodora! if the sages ask thee why This charm is wasted on the earth and sky, Tell them, dear, that if eyes were made for seeing, Then Beauty is its own excuse for being: Why thou wert there, 0 rival of the rose!

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