The Pacific Way: A Memoir (Google eBook)

Front Cover
University of Hawaii Press, Jan 1, 1997 - Biography & Autobiography - 280 pages
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Ratu Sir Kamisese's thoughtful and entertaining memoir of his personal and political life candidly outlines significant events in the development of Fiji, a plural society for which "The Pacific Way" holds a special and evocative meaning. The phrase inspired his 1970 partnership with the Indian opposition leader to produce a constitution whereby, in his own words, "people of different races, opinions and cultures can live and work together for the good of all, can differ without rancour, govern without malice, and accept responsibility as reasonable people intent on serving the interests of all." After leading Fiji through seventeen years of multiracial harmony, he found it ironic that his defeat in 1987, opposed by an Indian-dominated coalition and a fervid Fijian Nationalist Party, was provoked by his multiracialism. But this same multiracial vision enabled him, after the military coups in 1987, to lead an interim government that restored stability and economic progress. The same man who spent his early years fishing off Fiji's remote rocks and beaches played a valuable role, through his chosen delegates, in the creation of the Law of the Sea Convention, which Fiji was the first nation to sign. He later chaired international meetings of francophone and commonwealth countries in Brussels, and led their negotiations with the European Union which culminated in the Lome Convention and the adoption of preferential trading terms. His leadership was also evident at regional organizations, most notably the Pacific Forum. In addition to his long and distinguished political life, he tells of his chiefly heritage, his early education and medical studies at Otago University, his years at Oxford University, and his career as a colonial administrator. His many sporting achievements make clear that he is a man of many talents. Now, as the appointed President of Fiji, he is sustained by wide popular acclaim and affection. Very few Pacific leaders have published their opinions and perspectives on such a wide range of issues and topics. His memoir will be of interest to Pacific historians, political scientists, and anthropologists, as well as the general reader.
  

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The Pacific Way: A Memoir
Kamisese Mara (Ratu Sir) - Political Science - 1997 - 280 pages
Ratu Sir Kamisese's thoughtful and entertaining memoir of his personal and political life candidly outlines
significant events in the development of Fiji, a plural society for which "The Pacific Way" holds a special and evocative meaning. The phrase inspired his 1970 partnership with the Indian opposition leader to produce a constitution whereby, in his own words, "people of different races, opinions and cultures can live and work together for the good of all, can differ without rancour, govern without malice, and accept responsibility as reasonable people intent on serving the interests of all." After leading Fiji through seventeen years of multiracial harmony, he found it ironic that his defeat in 1987, opposed by an Indian-dominated coalition and a fervid Fijian Nationalist Party, was provoked by his multiracialism. But this same multiracial vision enabled him, after the military coups in 1987, to lead an interim government that restored stability and economic progress. The same man who spent his early years fishing off Fiji's remote rocks and beaches played a valuable role, through his chosen delegates, in the creation of the Law of the Sea Convention, which Fiji was the first nation to sign. He later chaired international meetings of francophone and commonwealth countries in Brussels, and led their negotiations with the European Union which culminated in the Lome Convention and the adoption of preferential trading terms. His leadership was also evident at regional organizations, most notably the Pacific Forum. In addition to his long and distinguished political life, he tells of his chiefly heritage, his early education and medical studies at Otago University, his years at Oxford University, and his career as a colonial administrator. His many sporting achievements make clear that he is a man of many talents. Now, as the appointed President of Fiji, he is sustained by wide popular acclaim and affection. Very few Pacific leaders have published their opinions and perspectives on such a wide range of issues and topics. His memoir will be of interest to Pacific historians, political scientists, and anthropologists, as well as the general reader. 

Selected pages

Contents

ORIGINS
1
EARLY DAYS
9
THE MEDICAL BACILLUS
18
BOLT FROM THE DARK BLUE
26
RETURN TO THE PACIFIC
34
FIRST TIME AT THE CENTRE
54
TOWARDS SELFGOVERNMENT
62
THE 1965 CONSTITUTIONAL CONFERENCE AND AFTERMATH
74
PACIFIC REGIONAL ORGANISATIONS
168
PROPOSALS FOR A GOVERNMENT OF NATIONAL UNITY AND THE 1982 ELECTION
181
FORWARD FROM 1982
186
MILITARY TAKEOVER
194
REBUILDING
201
MISSION COMPLETE
213
CHRONOLOGICAL RECORD
229
TEXT OF THE WAKAYA LETTER
233

A COMMONWEALTH ROUND
86
HONOURS AT HOME AND ABROAD
91
THE PATH TO INDEPENDENCE
96
INDEPENDENCE COUNTDOWN
105
FOREIGN AFFAIRS
113
THE MIDSEVENTIES
122
BACK IN HARNESS 19771982
138
COMMONWEALTH HEADS OF GOVERNMENT MEETINGS
145
SUGAR
159
THE SECRETARY OF STATES DESPATCH
235
ADDRESS TO THE UNITED NATIONS
237
CURRENTS IN THE PACIFIC
243
GRADUATION ADDRESS TO FIJI COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
255
TRIBUTE TO THE LATE PRESIDENT RATU SIR PENAIA GANILAU
261
GLOSSARY AND FIJIAN PRONUNCIATION
265
INDEX
269
Copyright

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