Prior Analytics

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Hackett Publishing, Jan 1, 1989 - Philosophy - 262 pages
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"This volume is an impressive tour de force. It is state-of-the-art Aristotle: it employs the most recent philological, philosophical, and logical advances which since the 1970's at least have rendered previous translations and commentaries obsolete. The translation is the first to take account of the recent epistemically orientated natural-deduction approach, which restores Aristotle's reputation as a consummate logician and reveals much more of Aristotle's method than previous approaches. Every page of Robin Smith's commentary shows extensive learning, taste, imagination, and skill. . . . An important and lasting contribution, not only to Aristotle scholarship and to the history of logic, but also to the history of philosophy itself." -- John Corcoran, SUNY Buffalo
  

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Contents

Prior Analytics
1
Book B
65
Notes to Book A
105
Notes to Book B
183
Appendix I
229
Appendix II
236
Bibliography
244
General Index
252
Copyright

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References from web pages

nationmaster - Encyclopedia: Syllogism
In his Prior Analytics, Aristotle defines syllogism as: "a discourse in which, certain things ... Prior Analytics is Aristotles work on deductive reasoning, ...
www.nationmaster.com/ encyclopedia/ Syllogism

About the author (1989)

Aristotle, 384 B.C. - 322 B. C. Aristotle was born at Stagira, in Macedonia, in 384 B.C. At the age of 17, he went to Athens to study at Plato's Academy, where he remained for about 20 years, as a student and then as a teacher. When Plato died in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias, was ruler. After Hermias was captured and executed by the Persians in 345 B.C., Aristotle went to Pella, the Macedonian capital, where he became the tutor of the king's young son Alexander, later known as Alexander the Great. In 335, when Alexander became king, Aristotle returned to Athens and established his own school, the Lyceum Aristotle's works were lost in the West after the decline of Rome, but during the 9th Century A.D., Arab scholars introduced Aristotle, in Arabic translation, to the Islamic world. In the 13th Century, the Latin West renewed its interest in Aristotle's work, and Saint Thomas Aquinas found in it a philosophical foundation for Christian thought. The influence of Aristotle's philosophy has been pervasive; it has even helped to shape modern language and common sense. Aristotle died in 322 B.C.

Professor Robin Smith is Head of the Centre for Process Integration at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) in the United Kingdom. Before joining UMIST he had extensive industrial experience with Rohm & Haas in process investigation and process design, and with ICI in computer-aided design and process integration.. He was a member of the ICI Process Integration Team that pioneered the first industrial applications of process integration design methods. Since joining UMIST he has acted extensively as a consultant in process integration projects. He has published widely in the field of chemical process design and integration, and is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the Institution of Chemical Engineers in the UK and a chartered engineer. In 1992 he was awarded the Hanson Medal of the Institution of Chemical Engineers in the UK for his work on clean process technology.

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