The Tavern Knight

Front Cover
Kessinger Publishing, Jun 1, 2004 - Fiction - 200 pages
11 Reviews
It was not to be his good fortune, however, to be in the earlier work of the day. Until afternoon he was kept within the walls of Worcester, chafing to be where hard knocks were being dealt - with Montgomery at Powick Bridge, or with Pittscottie on Bunn's Hill. But he was forced to hold his mood in curb, and wait until Charles and his advisers should elect to make the general attack.

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Review: The Tavern Knight

User Review  - Remus - Goodreads

Not as bad as the reviews made it out to be! A quick read that is actually a lot of fun and tht ending is hilarious although I'm not sure if it was meant to be. The beginning is quite exciting while ... Read full review

Review: The Tavern Knight

User Review  - John Beach - Goodreads

I've come to expect better of Sabatini, but this early work of his had it's moments. I was slow getting into it, and also I found the plot fairly predictable, some situations rather convenient. Still ... Read full review

About the author (2004)

Rafael Sabatini was born April 29, 1875 in Jesi, Italy. At a young age, Rafael was exposed to many languages, and attending school in Portugal and, as a teenager, in Switzerland. By the time he was seventeen, when he went to England to live permanently, he could speak five languages. He quickly added English and chose to write in his adopted language, because, he said, "all the best stories are written in English." After a brief stint in the business world, Sabatini went to work as a writer. He wrote short stories in the 1890s, and his first novel came out in 1902. It took Sabatini almost a quarter of century before he attained success with Scaramouche in 1921. It became an international best-seller. Captain Blood followed in 1922 and was equally as successful. Sabatini was a prolific writer; he produced a new book approximately every year. While he would never achieve the success of Scaramouche and Captain Blood, Sabatini still maintained a great deal of popularity with the reading public through the decades that followed. By the 1940s, illness forced the writer to slow his prolific method of composition. However, he did write several additional works even during that time. His body of work consists of 31 novels, 8 short story colections and 6 books of poetry. He died February 13, 1950 in Switzerland. He is buried at Adelboden, Switzerland.

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