The Trouble with Nigeria

Front Cover
Heinemann, 1984 - Political Science - 68 pages
6 Reviews
"The trouble with Nigeria is simply and squarely a failure of leadership," concludes internationally acclaimed writer Chinua Achebe
  

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Review: The Trouble with Nigeria

User Review  - Frankie Amett-realtor - Goodreads

This book should be re-titled "The Trouble with Africa". An excellent exposÚ on the reason Africa is the way it is and what we can do to change it. Read full review

Review: The Trouble with Nigeria

User Review  - Yaw Asare - Goodreads

This is a book not only applicable to Nigeria but Africa as a whole. Should be in the breast pocket of every African leader and citizen. The words in this are a word to the wise. Read full review

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Contents

Where the Problem Lies
1
Tribalism
5
False Image of Ourselves
9
Leadership NigerianStyle
11
Patriotism
15
Social Injustice and the Cult of Mediocrity
19
Indiscipline
27
Corruption
37
The Igbo Problem
45
The Example of Aminu Kano
51
Index
65
Copyright

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About the author (1984)

CHINUA ACHEBE was born in 1930 in the village of Ogidi in Eastern Nigeria. After studying medicine and literature at the University of Ibadan, he went to work for the Nigerian broadcasting company in Lagos. Things Fall Apart, his first novel was published in 1958. It sold over 2,000,000 copies, and has been translated into 30 languages. It was followed by No Longer at Ease, then Arrow of God (which won the first New Statesman Jock Campbell Prize), then A Man of the People (a novel dealing with post-independence Nigeria). Achebe has also written short stories and children's books, and Beware Soul Brother, a book of his poetry, won the Commonwealth Poetry Prize in 1972.Achebe has been at the Universities of Nigeria, Massachusetts and Connecticut, and among the many honours he has received are the award of a Fellowship of the Modern Language Association of America, and doctorates from the Universities of Stirling, Southampton and Kent. He followed Heinrich Boll, th

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