The Plays of Oscar Wilde, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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J. W. Luce, 1905
12 Reviews
  

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Review: The Plays of Oscar Wilde

User Review  - Bronwen Barton - Goodreads

only had to read the importance of being earnest for uni but I think at some point I might delve into the rest of these as it was really good Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JVioland - LibraryThing

Uneven, but mostly humorous, especially the Importance of Being Earnest. Read full review

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Page 22 - ... definite effort to produce at any rate one parent, of either sex, before the season is quite over. JACK: Well, I don't see how I could possibly manage to do that. I can produce the hand-bag at any moment. It is in my dressing-room at home. I really think that should satisfy you, Lady Bracknell. LADY BRACKNELL: Me, sir! What has it to do with me? You can hardly imagine that I and Lord Bracknell would dream of allowing our only daughter a girl brought up with the utmost care to marry into...
Page 60 - It is the first time in my life that I have ever been reduced to such a painful position, and I am really quite inexperienced in doing anything of the kind.
Page 2 - Is marriage so demoralizing as that? Lane. I believe it is a very pleasant state, sir. I have had very little experience of it myself up to the present.
Page 68 - In matters of grave importance, style, not sincerity, is the vital thing.
Page 55 - GWENDOLEN. (Quite politely, rising.) My darling Cecily, I think there must be some slight error. Mr. Ernest Worthing is engaged to me. The announcement will appear in the "Morning Post
Page 18 - LADY BRACKNELL. I am glad to hear it. A man should always have an occupation of some kind. There are far too many idle men in London as it is. How old are you?
Page 60 - CECILY [rather brightly]: There is just one question I would like to be allowed to ask my guardian. GWENDOLEN: An admirable idea! Mr Worthing, there is just one question I would like to be permitted to put to you. Where is your brother Ernest?
Page 6 - I don't propose to discuss modern culture. It isn't the sort of thing one should talk of in private. I simply want my cigarette case back. ALGERNON. Yes; but this isn't your cigarette case. This cigarette case is a present from someone of the name of Cecily, and you said you didn't know anyone of that name.
Page 76 - That does not seem to me to be a grave objection. Thirty-five is a very attractive age. London society is full of women of the very highest birth who have, of their own free choice, remained thirty-five for years.
Page 26 - GWENDOLEN: Ernest, we may never be married. From the expression on mamma's face I fear we never shall. Few parents now-a-days pay any regard to what their children say to them. The old-fashioned respect for the young is fast dying out.

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