The Dictionary of National Biography, Volume 11 (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1887 - Great Britain
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Page 231 - Bracton saith, quod Rex non debet esse sub homine sed sub Deo et lege [that the King ought not to be under man but under God and under the law—BT\.
Page 230 - Well, I will now make it appear to the world, that there never lived a viler viper upon the face of the earth than thou.
Page 231 - ... true it was, that God had endowed His Majesty with excellent science, and great endowments of nature; but His Majesty was not learned in the laws of his realm of England, and causes which concern the life, or inheritance, or goods, or fortunes of his subjects, are not to be decided by natural reason but by the artificial reason and judgment of law, which law is an art which requires long study and experience, before that a man can attain to the cognizance of it...
Page 231 - King said, that he thought the law was founded upon reason, and that he and others had reason, as well as the Judges : to which it was answered by me, thai true it was, that God had endowed His Majesty with excellent science, and great endowments of nature; but His Majesty was not learned in the laws of his realm of England, and causes which concern the life, or inheritance, or goods, or fortunes of his subjects...
Page 150 - The name which ought to be and which will be associated with the success of these measures is the name of the man who, acting, I believe, from pure and disinterested motives, has advocated their cause with untiring energy, and by appeals to reason...
Page 204 - ... all of them to be under the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience; who shall be obliged to study and practice physic and chirurgery, as well as divinity ; that by the apparent usefulness of the former to all mankind, they may both endear themselves to the people, and have the better opportunities of doing good to men's souls, whilst they are taking care of their bodies; but the particulars of the constitution I leave to the Society composed of wise and good men.
Page 107 - In spite of outward blemishes, she shone, For humour fam'd, and humour all her own. Easy, as if at home, the stage she trod, Nor sought the critic's praise, nor fear'd his rod. Original in spirit and in ease, She pleas'd by hiding all attempts to please. No comic actress ever yet could raise, On humour's base, more merit or more praise.
Page 379 - Have you seen the Works of two young Authors, a Mr. Warton and a Mr. Collins, both writers of Odes? it is odd enough, but each is the half of a considerable Man, and one the counterpart of the other. The first has but little Invention, very poetical choice of Expression, and a good Ear. The second, a fine fancy, model'd upon the Antique, a bad Ear, great Variety of Words, and Images with no Choice at all. They both deserve to last some years, but will not.
Page 112 - I cannot doubt, to add an anecdote to the ac" count of this celebrated siege. When provisions be" came so scarce that there was a fear that famine might " compel them to surrender, the Sepoys proposed to Clive " to limit them to the water (or gruel) in which the rice " was boiled. ' It is,' they said, ' sufficient for our sup"'port; the Europeans require the grain.
Page 314 - tis a good shape enough if measured, but my gait is awkward, and the walk of the whole man indicates indolence capable of energies.

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