Politics (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Nov 1, 2008 - Philosophy - 368 pages
55 Reviews
The writings of Greek philosopher ARISTOTLE (384BC322Bestudent of Plato, teacher of Alexander the Greatare among the most influential on Western thought, and indeed upon Western civilization itself. From theology and logic to ethics and even biology, there is no area of human knowledge that has not been touched by his thinking. In Politicsconsidered a companion piece to Aristotles Nicomachean Ethicsthe philosopher discusses the nature of the state, of citizenship, of public education and private wealth. In what is a response to the works of his teacher Plato, Aristotle explores the idea of the individual household as a microcosm and building block of the state; examines trade and the economy as functions of human affairs; discusses the battle between self-interest and nationalism; and much more. This edition features the classic introduction by H.W.C. Davis, the renowned English historian of the early 20th century. Students of philosophy, government, and human nature continue to find Aristotles Politics a provocative work more than two millennia after it was written.
  

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Review: Politics

User Review  - Gaopdgd9vjryrodp86 - Goodreads

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Review: Politics

User Review  - Rosemary Kind - Goodreads

Despite the obvious differences in our times, many passages of the book could as easily have been written about today as 2500 years ago. Our views on slavery may not have changed, but the nature of politics has altered little. Some interesting ideas, still worthy of consideration. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
7
III
25
IV
54
V
100
VI
145
VII
187
VIII
237
IX
257
X
300
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About the author (2008)

Aristotle, 384 B.C. - 322 B. C. Aristotle was born at Stagira, in Macedonia, in 384 B.C. At the age of 17, he went to Athens to study at Plato's Academy, where he remained for about 20 years, as a student and then as a teacher. When Plato died in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias, was ruler. After Hermias was captured and executed by the Persians in 345 B.C., Aristotle went to Pella, the Macedonian capital, where he became the tutor of the king's young son Alexander, later known as Alexander the Great. In 335, when Alexander became king, Aristotle returned to Athens and established his own school, the Lyceum Aristotle's works were lost in the West after the decline of Rome, but during the 9th Century A.D., Arab scholars introduced Aristotle, in Arabic translation, to the Islamic world. In the 13th Century, the Latin West renewed its interest in Aristotle's work, and Saint Thomas Aquinas found in it a philosophical foundation for Christian thought. The influence of Aristotle's philosophy has been pervasive; it has even helped to shape modern language and common sense. Aristotle died in 322 B.C.

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