The Natural History of the Ruminating Animals, ...: Goats, sheep, wild and domestic cattle, &c (Google eBook)

Front Cover
W.H. Lizars, ... S. Highley, ... London; and W. Curry jun. & Company Dublin., 1836 - Ruminants - 270 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 254 - The bison wanders constantly from place to place, either from being disturbed by hunters or in quest of food. They are much attracted by the soft tender grass, which springs up after a fire has spread over the prairie. In winter they scrape away the snow with their feet to reach the grass. The bulls and cows live in separate herds, for the greater part of the year, but at all seasons, one or two old bulls generally accompany a large herd of cows.
Page 220 - Dark is his hide on either side, but the blood within doth boil, And the dun hide glows, as if on fire, as he paws to the turmoil: His eyes are jet, and they are set in crystal rings of snow; But now they stare with one red glare of brass upon the foe. Upon the forehead of the bull the horns stand close and near; From out the broad and wrinkled skull like daggers, they appear...
Page 220 - His legs are short, his hams are thick, his hoofs are black as night; Like a strong flail he holds his tail in fierceness of his might; Like something molten out of iron, or hewn from forth the rock, Harpado of Xarama stands, to bide the alcayde's shock.
Page 226 - The combats of the amphitheatre were dangerous and bloody. Every champion successively encountered a wild bull: and the victory may be ascribed to the quadrupeds, since no more than eleven were left on the field, with the loss of nine wounded and eighteen killed on the side of their adversaries. Some of the noblest families might mourn, but the pomp of the funerals, in the churches of St. John Lateran and St.
Page 209 - A small saddle of plaited rushes is laid on him, when sacks made of goatskins, and filled with corn, are lashed on his broad and able back. A leather thong is passed through the cartilage of his nose, and serves as a bridle, while on the top of the load is mounted the owner, his wife, or his slave.
Page 184 - The nyl-ghau, with the quickness of lightning, darted against the wood-work with such violence, that he broke it to pieces, and broke off one of his horns close to the root, which occasioned the animal's death.
Page 219 - Gazul, turn," the people cry the third comes up behind, Low to the sand his head holds he, his nostrils snuff the wind ; The mountaineers that lead the steers, without stand whispering low, " Now thinks this proud alcayde to stun Harpado so?
Page 218 - The deeds they've done, the spoils they've won, fill all with hope and trust; Yet, ere high in heaven appears the sun, they all have bit the dust.
Page 54 - For the prisoner, you have had one gentleman called, who is likewise of the faculty, and a very able man. I can hardly say what his opinion is, for he does not seem to have formed any opinion at all of the matter. He, at first, said he could not form an opinion whether the death was or was not occasioned by the poison, because he could conceive that it might be ascribed to other causes. I wished very much to have got a direct answer from Mr.
Page 228 - There is still another place, built in the form of a Theatre, which serves for the baiting of Bulls and Bears ; they are fastened behind, and then worried by great English bull-dogs; but not without great...

Bibliographic information