Memoirs of Lieut.-General Scott, LL.D. (Google eBook)

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Sheldon, 1864 - Generals - 653 pages
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Contents

I
ix
II
1
III
11
IV
18
V
30
VI
49
VII
54
VIII
69
XIII
147
XIV
155
XV
168
XVI
175
XVII
191
XVIII
204
XIX
217
XX
233

IX
86
X
110
XI
124
XII
135
XXI
258
XXII
275
XXIII
301

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Page 83 - I AM monarch of all I survey, My right there is none to dispute ; From the centre all round to the sea I am lord of the fowl and the brute. 0 Solitude ! where are the charms That sages have seen in thy face ? Better dwell in the midst of alarms Than reign in this horrible place.
Page 286 - And whereas no man can be forejudged of life or limb, or subjected in time of peace to any kind of punishment within this realm by martial law, or in any other manner than by the judgment of his peers, and according to the known and established laws of this realm...
Page xvi - History may be formed from permanent monuments and records ; but Lives can only be written from personal knowledge, which is growing every day less, and in a short time is lost for ever. What is known can seldom be immediately told; and when it might be told, it is no longer known. The delicate features of the mind, the nice discriminations of character, and the minute peculiarities of conduct, are soon obliterated...
Page 241 - Lands intersected by a narrow frith Abhor each other. Mountains interposed Make enemies of nations, who had else Like kindred drops been mingled into one.
Page xx - ... slightest particulars of the slightest transactions— all the things done and all the words uttered during the time of which it treats. The omission of any circumstance, however insignificant, would be a defect. If history were written thus, the Bodleian Library would not contain the occurrences of a week. What is told in the fullest and most accurate annals bears an infinitely small proportion to what is suppressed. The difference between the copious work of Clarendon and the account of the...
Page 84 - Better dwell in the midst of alarms, Than reign in this horrible place. 1 am out of humanity's reach, I must finish my journey alone, Never hear the sweet music of speech, I start at the sound of my own. The beasts that roam over the plain My form with indifference see, They are so unacquainted with man, Their tameness is shocking to me.
Page 301 - I say, a man of mild disposition, of command of temper, of an open, social, and cheerful humour, capable of attachment, but little susceptible of enmity, and of great moderation in all my passions. Even my love of literary fame, my ruling passion, never soured my temper, notwithstanding my frequent disappointments.
Page xvi - Providence has distinguished with the abilities either of doing such actions as are worthy of being related, or of relating them in a manner worthy of being read ; but doubly happy are they who are blessed with both these uncommon talents...
Page 221 - I am as free as nature first made man, Ere the base laws of servitude began, When wild in woods the noble savage ran.
Page 296 - Officer and officers of every regiment, troop, or company, to which the person or persons so accused shall belong are hereby required, upon application duly made by, or in behalf of the party or parties injured, to use...

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