The Dramatic Works of Beaumont and Fletcher: Printed from the Text, and with the Notes of George Colman (Google eBook)

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John Stockdale, 1811
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Page 251 - Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead ! In peace there's nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility : But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger...
Page 149 - Drink to-day, and drown all sorrow ; You shall perhaps not do it to-morrow : Best, while you have it, use your breath ; There is no drinking after death.
Page 46 - HEAR, ye ladies that despise, What the mighty love has done ; Fear examples, and be wise : Fair Calisto was a nun ; Leda, sailing on the stream To deceive the hopes of man, Love accounting but a dream, Doted on a silver swan ; Danae, in a brazen tower, Where no love was, loved a shower. Hear, ye ladies that are coy, What the mighty love can do ; Fear the fierceness of the boy : The chaste moon he...
Page 438 - And the green turf lie lightly on thy breast: There shall the morn her earliest tears bestow, There the first roses of the year shall blow; While angels with their silver wings o'ershade The ground now sacred by thy reliques made.
Page 171 - Take, oh take those lips away, That so sweetly were forsworn; And those eyes, the break of day, Lights that do mislead the morn; But my kisses bring again, bring again, Seals of love, but seal'd in vain. seal'd in vain.
Page 463 - When it was grown to dark midnight, And all were fast asleep, In came Margaret's grimly ghost, And stood at William's feet.
Page 251 - Disguise fair nature with hard-favour'd rage; Then lend the eye a terrible aspect; Let it pry through the portage of the head Like the brass cannon ; let the brow o'erwhelm it As fearfully as doth a galled rock O'erhang and jutty his confounded base, Swill'd with the wild and wasteful ocean.
Page 476 - I would not be a serving-man To carry the cloak-bag still, Nor would I be a falconer The greedy hawks to fill ; But I would be in a good house, And have a good master too ; But I would eat and drink of the best, And no work would I do.
Page 479 - Gentlemen, countrymen, friends, and my fellow-soldiers, I have brought you this day, from the shops of security and the counters of content, to measure out in these furious fields honour by the ell, and prowess by the pound.
Page 398 - WEEP no more, nor sigh, nor groan; Sorrow calls no time that's gone; Violets plucked the sweetest rain Makes not fresh nor grow again; Trim thy locks, look cheerfully; Fate's hid ends eyes cannot see; Joys as winged dreams fly fast, Why should sadness longer last? Grief is but a wound to woe; Gentlest fair, mourn, mourn no mo.

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