Palaeozoic Vertebrate Biostratigraphy and Biogeography

Front Cover
John A. Long
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993 - Science - 369 pages
0 Reviews
"In the last twenty years or so there has been an upsurge in the study of Palaeozoic fishes for solving geological problems, both in areas of biostratigraphy and biogeography. This has resulted in an explosion of data, much of it so new that it will take years for all the recent discoveries to be published. This book has resulted to fill the need to provide up-to-date summaries of global work in progress showing the application of both macroscopic and microscopic remains of Palaeozoic vertebrates to geological correlations, and to refinement of global palaeogeographic reconstructions."--from the Preface.

This book offers the first detailed treatment of palaeozoic vertebrates for use in correlations and in biogeographic studies. With thirteen chapters of systematic analysis of biostratigraphic and biogeographic data, it includes invaluable summaries of current research as well as new and significant contributions to the fields of geology and evolutionary biology. With charts and figures that show many of the important fossils discussed in the text, as well as stratigraphic, location, and taxonomic indexes, the book will interest palaeontologists, stratigraphers, and other earth scientists concerned with the early history of life on earth.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Morphological characteristics of Palaeozoic
3
Palaeozoic global reconstructions
25
EarlyMiddle Palaeozoic vertebrate extinction events
54
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1993)

John Long is vice president of research and collections at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. His other books include, most recently, "Frozen in Time: Prehistoric Life of Antarctica "and "The Rise of Fishes".

Bibliographic information