History of Princeton and Its Institutions, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J.B. Lippincott & Company, 1879 - Princeton (N.J.)
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Page 173 - that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.
Page 169 - ... recommendations to their grateful country, and his prayers to the God of armies. May ample justice be done them here, and may the choicest of Heaven's favors, both here and hereafter, attend those who, under the Divine auspices, have secured innumerable blessings for others. With these wishes, and this benediction, the commander-in-chief is about to retire from service. The curtain of separation will soon be drawn, and the military scene to him will be closed for ever.
Page 167 - In other nations many have performed services, for which they have deserved and received the thanks of the Public. But to you, Sir, peculiar praise is due. Your services have been essential in acquiring and establishing the freedom and independence of your country. They deserve the grateful acknowledgments of a free and independent Nation.
Page 168 - ... the honor to command, he can only again offer in their behalf his recommendations to their grateful country, and his prayers to the God of armies. May ample justice be done them here, and may the choicest of Heaven's favors, both here and hereafter, attend those who, under the Divine auspices, have secured innumerable blessings for others.
Page 144 - ... troops, (many of them having had no rest for two nights and a day,) and the danger of losing the advantage we had gained by aiming at too much, induced me, by the advice of my officers, to relinquish the attempt : but, in my judgment, six or eight hundred fresh troops, upon a forced march, would have destroyed all their stores and magazines taken (as we have since learned) their military chest, containing seventy thousand pounds and put an end to the war.
Page 136 - Fitzgerald, horror-struck at the death of his beloved commander, dropped the reins upon his horse's neck, and drew his hat over his face, that he might not see him die. A roar of musketry succeeds, and then a shout. It was the shout of victory. The aid-de-camp ventures to raise his eyes : oh ! glorious sight, the enemy are broken and flying ; while, dimly amid the glimpses of the smoke, is seen the chief, " alive, unharmed, and without a wound," waving his hat, and cheering his comrades to the pursuit.
Page 144 - ... the field ; and, with what I have with me and what were taken in the pursuit and carried across the Delaware, there are near three hundred prisoners, fourteen of whom are officers, all British.
Page 168 - ... it only remains for the Commander-in-chief to address himself once more, and that for the last time, to the armies of the United States (however widely dispersed the individuals who compose them may be), and to bid them an affectionate, a long farewell.
Page 98 - Their letter to the merchants in Philadelphia requesting their concurrence was lately burnt by the students of this place in the college yard, all of them appearing in their black gowns, and the bell tolling.
Page 144 - The rear of the enemy's army lying at Maidenhead (not more than five .or six miles from Princeton) was up with us before our pursuit was over : but, as I had the precaution to destroy the bridge over Stony Brook, (about half a mile from the field of action,) they were so long retarded there as to give us time to move off in good order for this place.