Encyclopedia of British Humorists: Geoffrey Chaucer to John Cleese, Volume 2

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Steven H. Gale
Taylor & Francis, Feb 1, 1996 - History - 1368 pages
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HUMOR IS AN INTEGRAL PART OF BRITISH LIFE AND LITERATURE
In "The Screwtape Letters, " C.S. Lewis's title character observes that Jokes and Flippancy are valued so highly by the English, "who take their 'sense of humour' so seriously that a deficiency in this sense is almost the only deficiency at which they feel shame." J.B. Priestly, too, in a related observation comments: "It is curious that so few foreigners have noticed that we English are a humorous race....In no other country will you hear so much talk about a sense of humour."
COVERS HUMOROUS LITERATURE FROM MEDIEVAL TO MODERN TIMES
Now for the first time, a comprehensive and up-to-date reference work tackles the subject of humor as it has been expressed in British literature, from "Beowulf" to the present. The 206 signed original essays represent the work of 119 scholars from seven countries and diverse disciplines. Major literary figures such as Jonathan Swift, Oscar Wilde, G.B. Shaw, and Noel Coward are included, as well as lesser known lights such as Francis Beaumont, Stella Gibbons, and George Du Maurier. Readers may be surprised to learn that other literary luminaries such as W.H. Auden, Winston Churchill, Samuel Johnson, and Edith Sitwell have also produced humorous writings.
ANALYZES LITERARY AND COMIC TECHNIQUES
The most important feature of the essays is their literary analysis, which provides an overview of the author's writings, as well as in-depth analyses of comic techniques in the subject's major works. A biography helps place the writer in historical context, providing such information as the place and date of birth, education, honors and achievements, marital status, and place and date of death. In addition to the signed essays, the "Encyclopedia" includes a preface, a chronological index, a list of pseudonyms, an introduction, a list of the contributors, and an index.
  

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Contents

Ackerley J
3
Adams Douglas
6
Addi son Joseph
10
Amis Kingsley
15
Amis Martin Louis
22
Anderson Lindsay Gordon
26
Anstey
35
Armin Robert
38
Byron Lord George Gordon 378 Foote Samuel
190
1018
143
Calverley Charles Stuart 382 Ford Ford Madox 206 Carey Henry 389 Forster E M
302
Hankin St John
511
Hardy Thomas
513
Herbert A
519
Herbert George
522
Hoffnung Gerard
525

Armstrong John
41
Auden W
45
Austen Jane
59
Ayckbourn Alan
66
Bagnold Enid Algerine
73
Barnes Peter
77
Barrie James Matthew
85
Bashford Henry Howarth
89
Beaumont Francis
92
Beerbohm Max 307 Dickens Charles
114
Behan Brendan 315 DIsraeli Isaac
118
Belloc Joseph Peter Rene Hilaire 319 Donne John
128
Benson E E 329 Douglas Norman
132
Bemley E C 333 Dryden John
138
The Beowulf Poet 337 Du Maurier George
142
Betjeman John 340 Dunbar William
146
Bradbury Malcolm Stanley 345 Ewart Gavin
151
Browning Robert 351 Farquhar George
157
Bunbury Henry William 355 Fergusson Robert
164
Burnand Francis Cowley 358 Fielding Henry
168
Burney Frances Fanny 365 Finch Anne
172
Burns Robert 369 Firbank Ronald
177
Butler Samuel 371 Fletcher John
185
Hogg James
529
Hone William
531
Hood Thomas
535
Hook Theodore Edward
540
Hope Anthony
543
Housman A
547
Howleglas
550
Huxley Aldous Leonard
552
Isherwood Christopher
557
Jacobs W
565
Jellicoe
569
Jerome Jerome Klapka
573
Jerrold Douglas William
579
Johnson Samuel
585
Jonson
595
Joyce James
608
Kempe William
621
Kipling Rudyard
625
Volume 2
628
Lamb Charles
635
Lear Edward 650 Lemon Mark 656 Levy Benn Wolfe 661 Lewis C S 671 Lewis Wyndham 684 Livings Henry 691 Lodge David 701 Lonsdale Fred...
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Page 592 - This therefore is the praise of Shakespeare, that his drama is the mirror of life; that he who has mazed his imagination in following the phantoms which other writers raise up before him, may here be cured of his delirious ecstasies by reading human sentiments in human language; by scenes from which a hermit may estimate the transactions of the world, and a confessor predict the progress of the passions.

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About the author (1996)

Gale is the Endowed Chair of the Humanitites at Kentucky State University.

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