Every Man His Own Butler (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Whittaker, 1839 - Wine and wine making - 200 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xv - when the necessity for saying ' NO ' is strongly felt. "The courage to do this, and that absence of all fear of being accounted singular which it is a man's duty to cultivate, if he wish to be thought worthy of his species will prevent his suffering in stomach or moral character from that tablecomplaisance which the too pliant force upon themselves contrary to their better feelings.
Page xiv - Lafitte would lose half their flavour in heavy coarse glass, though to the thick oily wines de liqueur or to sweet wines, the same rule of adaptation does not seem to apply. The glass and the specific gravity of the wine should harmonise. The ancients had a passion for particular wine-cups. The rich murrhine cup, out of which the emperors and patricians drank their Falernian wine, the Surrentine, the cups or vases of Saguntum in Spain, and SO on. The murrhine cup was the great luxury, because it...
Page 55 - Champagne should be kept in a cool cellar, and not be removed from the case until wanted for drinking, where the practice is not inconvenient. If kept out of the case, quartz sand is the best substance in which to imbed the bottles, which should still have laths between each tier. Sillery in bad cellars will sometimes take the effervescing quality.
Page xii - ... sit silent and solemn as so many quakers, among the fair sex. Such are past the stage of innocent excitement by a rational quantity of the juice of the grape. They take it because the effect is a temporary indifference, an agreeable suspense from pleasure and from pain. Such are not the true enjoyers of wine in its legitimate use ; and they should always rise and retire with the ladies, for the effect upon them is that of a narcotic. The true enjoyer of wine finds it exhilarate the spirits, increase...
Page 150 - Do this until the last portion remain undissolved. The spirit contained in the fluid will then be separated, the potash abstracting all the water, and the spirit forming a stratum separating upon the salt. Make the experiment in a glass tube from half an inch to two inches in diameter graduated into 100 parts, and the quantity of spirit per cent. may be read off at once. To detect colouring matter in...
Page xiv - stomach-drinkers,' and may as well attain the lodgment of the fluid in the part desired by means of a forcing pump and a tube as any other mode. The palate to them is secondary to the warmth of this general magazine of liquids and solids. " One of true oinographical taste must feel a horror at association over wine with such persons. A refinement even in our sins is better than the grossness of the coarser natures of mankind in animal vices. How much does this tell in innocent enjoyment. " As Chesterfield...
Page xiv - AH delicate wines should be taken out of thin glasses. The reason why wines of this class drink better out of such glasses it is impossible to say. The greatest objection, except to the opulent, is the ease with which such glasses are broken by servants, which renders them expensive. Their form may be adapted to the fancy or to the reigning fashion. To a man of taste in such matters, Eomance and Lafitte would lose half their flavour in heavy coarse glass, though to the thick oily wines de liqueur...
Page xii - The art of taking wine is the science of exciting agreeable conversation and eliciting brilliant thoughts for an idle hour between the repast and the drawing-room. Wine makes some men dull ; such persons should on no account drink the strong brandied wines of the south, but confine themselves to the light red French growths, or to the white, pregnant with carbonic gas. If these fail to promote cheerfulness ; if with the light Burgundy, with Lafitte...
Page xii - Lafitte, or the etherial sparkle of champagne, a man continue unmoved, he may depend the innocent use of wine cannot be his. He may excite himself by the stronger kinds, and half intoxicate himself to raise a leaven of agreeability which is altogether artificial ; he may woo mirth "sorrowfully," but he will only injure his stomach and cloud his brain.

Bibliographic information