Making Sense of Humanity: And Other Philosophical Papers 1982-1993

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 30, 1995 - Philosophy - 251 pages
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Like the two earlier volumes of Bernard Williams' papers published by Cambridge University Press, Problems of the Self and Moral Luck, Making Sense of Humanity will be welcomed by all readers with a serious interest in philosophy. It is published alongside a volume of essays on Williams' work, World, Mind and Ethics: Essays on the Ethical Philosophy of Bernard Williams, edited by J.E.J. Altham and Ross Harrison, which provides a reappraisal of his work by other distinguished thinkers in the field.
  

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Contents

How free does the will need to be?
3
Voluntary acts and responsible agents
22
Internal reasons and the obscurity of blame
35
Moral incapacity
46
Acts and omissions doing and not doing
56
Nietzsches minimalist moral psychology
65
Making sense of humanity
79
Evolutionary theory and epistemology
90
The point of view of the universe Sidgwick and the ambitions of ethics
153
Ethics and the fabric of the world
172
What does intuitionism imply?
182
Professional morality and its dispositions
192
Who needs ethical knowledge?
203
Which slopes are slippery?
213
Resenting ones own existence
224
Must a concern for the environment be centred on human beings?
233

Evolution ethics and the representation problem
100
Formal structures and social reality
111
Formal and substantial individualism
123
SaintJusts illusion
135
Moral luck a postscript
241
Index
248
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About the author (1995)

Bernard Williams (1929-2003) was White's Professor of Moral Philosophy at Oxford University, and Monroe Deutsch Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley. His previous books include "Descartes: The Project of Pure Inquiry (1979), "Moral Luck (1981), and "Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy (1985).

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