LETTERS OF THE CULTURE AND MANUFACTURE OF COTTON (Google eBook)

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1850
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Page 34 - Evidently because my statements were calculated to give encouragement to manufactures at the South, and to bring them into competition with those of the North. What other motives could have animated those who have assailed me ! I pretended not, though I could have done it, to penetrate the veil hung over the doings of northern manufacturers. My effort was to show the southern people what they might do — not by reference to the doings of a number of pretended " first class mills," but to others...
Page 31 - Had Mr. Lawrence an object in making the comparative statement above alluded to without a reference to the qualifying statement in his first number ? It may be so. Perhaps Mr. Lawrence wished to persuade the cotton planter to promote the planter's interest, no...
Page 12 - To carry out the plan of withholding cotton," (from the European market,) " it will be necessary to obtain the passage of a law imposing an export duty. Without this, it would be impossible to prevent it from going abroad, as soon as the withdrawal of a portion had produced its effect of raising the price in Europe." Of all the laughable propositions ever made by a wise man, no one ever exceeded this in absurdity — no, not even that laid down by some other modern Solomon, the extraction of gold...
Page 33 - The call was, after a time, responded to by me, and, as in duty bound, I gave them facts in an honest and truthful manner — facts that I have fully substantiated — and to establish which, on the basis of future operations, also, I hold myself pledged and bound to do. I have not only the ability, but the means to do it. Fully aware of the reluctance of northern manufacturers to have the details and results of their operations exposed, and wishing neither to excite their animosity, to alarm their...
Page 33 - Merchants' Magazine for November, 1849," was written by the especial request of southern men, and the abridgment was made also by request. The southern people wished for information on the subject of cotton manufactures, in order to know whether it was, or was not, prudent for them to engage in the business.
Page 34 - ... to be understood, I had made exaggerated statements relative to mills erected by me. And how have they succeeded? There is scarcely a statement made by them that has not been proved fallacious— not a statement of mine that has not been substantiated. Mr. Lawrence has driven me, in selfdefence, to bring out facts, relative to which, if let alone, I should have been silent. If they have a heavy and injurious bearing on the northern manufacturing interest, those connected with it may thank their...
Page 34 - Thus far, they have just been touched on by me, and there it is my wish to leave them ; yet much remains behind, that some would rather should be permitted to rest undisturbed. So shall it rest, unless farther provocation shall call it out.
Page 31 - North, to aid in the upbuilding of northern manufacturing cities, in progress or in embryo, or to arrest the fall of certain mills, by purchasing their stocks, already 40 per cent. below par. Such may have been the case. Let others judge. It may be otherwise; but his frequent croakings about the hazards, the disasters, the failures, and, at best, the small profits of the manufacturing business, seem mightily like a sort of squinting toward the object of restraining the southern people from entering...
Page 34 - ... but to others of my own building. Mr. Lawrence, and others, apparently alarmed at this, and fearing the result, entered the arena, and, by insinuations, inuendos, and broad statements, have endeavored to fix the falsehood upon me ; not because I had misrepresented northern mills, or their products or profits, but because, as they would have it to be understood, I had made exaggerated statements relative to mills erected by me. And how have they succeeded ? There is scarcely a statement made by...
Page 25 - ... that time to this, there has been kept up a continual race of improvement, which has rendered the expenditure of vast sums of money necessary to those who have kept up with the times; while those who have refused to do so, have either broken themselves down by a spurious economy, or, at best, plodded on with little profit. The southern people will enter the field with all these improvements ready made to their hands; and, what is also of vast importance to them, the new and improved machinery...

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