On the Art of Writing

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 18, 2008 - Biography & Autobiography - 218 pages
5 Reviews
Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch (1863-1944), who often published under the pen-name of 'Q', was one of the giants of early twentieth-century literature and literary criticism. A novelist and poet who was also a Professor of English, he helped to form the literary tastes of generations of literary students and scholars who came after him. The freshness, enthusiasm and intellectual insight of his work is still evident in his writings nearly a century on. Cambridge University Press is delighted to reissue some of his key texts in this new edition.
  

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Review: On the Art of Writing

User Review  - Kilian Metcalf - Goodreads

Many people have heard the advice to writers to 'murder your darlings,' but few know the source. It is commonly attributed to Stephen King. This is amusing because when he quotes the phrase in King's ... Read full review

Review: On the Art of Writing

User Review  - Jan De la Rosa - Goodreads

It started really interesting then got boring then I lost all interest in it. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

INAUGURAL
1
THE PRACTICE OF WRITING
19
ON THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN VERSE AND PROSE
38
ON THE CAPITAL DIFFICULTY OF VERSE
55
INTERLUDE ON JARGON
73
ON THE CAPITAL DIFFICULTY OF PROSE
92
SOME PRINCIPLES REAFFIRMED
111
ON THE LINEAGE OF ENGLISH LITERATURE I
128
ON THE LINEAGE OF ENGLISH LITERATURE II
146
ENGLISH LITERATURE IN OUR UNIVERSITIES I
167
ENGLISH LITERATURE IN OUR UNIVERSITIES II
187
ON STYLE
201
INDEX
215
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch was born on November 21, 1863 at Bodmin in the county of Cornwall, England. His sisters, Florence Mabel and Lilian, were also writers. While attending Trinity College, Oxford he wrote Dead Man's Rock under the pseudonym "Q" in 1882. He moved to London that same year. He wrote The Astonishing History of Troy Town (1888) and The Splendid Spur (1889). He married Louisa Amelia on August 22, 1889. They had two children; daughter Foy and son Bevil. Bevil died in Germany during the flu epidemic of 1919. While in London, Quiller-Couch took up journalism and was assistant editor to Cassell Publishing's Liberal weekly "The Speaker". In 1891 he and Louisa settled at their home 'The Haven' by the sea at Fowey in Cornwall, upon the advice of his doctor. His love of yachting and rowing led to his being appointed Commodore of the Royal Fowey Yacht Club in 1911 until his death in 1944. Quiller-Couch spent much of his time on the Oxford Book of English Verse 1250-1900 (1900), The Oxford Book of Ballads (1910), and The Oxford Book of English Prose (1923). During his years in Cornwall he held a number of offices and participated in many committees, advocating system reform. This led to his being knighted in 1910. In 1912 until his death Quiller-Couch was appointed professor of English literature at Cambridge University. He published many of his lectures that were popular, including On the Art of Writing (1916) and On the Art of Reading (1920). On May 12, 1944 died of mouth cancer at his house in Fowey.