An Account of Church Bells: With Some Notices of Wiltshire Bells and Bell-founders. Containing a Copious List of Founders, a Comparative Scale of Tenor Bells, and Inscriptions from Nearly Five Hundred Parishes in Various Parts of the Kingdom (Google eBook)

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J. H. Parker, 1857 - Bell-founders - 149 pages
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1857 /149pp. /Inner Annexe L

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Page 40 - ... vastly fond of great noises that fill the ear, such as the firing of cannon, drums and the ringing of bells, so that it is common for a number of them that have got a glass in their heads to go up into some belfry and ring the bells for hours together for the sake of exercise.
Page 134 - And I was taught to proclaim the hours of unheeded time, 195 years had I sounded these awful warnings, When I was broken By the hands of inconsiderate and unskilful men, In the year 1790 I was cast into the furnace, Refounded at London And returned to my sacred vocation. Reader, Thou also shalt know a resurrection, May it be unto eternal life. Thomas Mears, fecit, London, 1790.
Page 74 - I to the Church the living call, and to the grave do summon all, AR 1728.
Page 39 - Be it known to all that doth me see, That Newcombe, of Leicester, made me.
Page 134 - MARCUS KNOX, A Merchant in Glasgow, Zealous for the interest of the Reformed Religion, Caused me to be fabricated in Holland For the use of his fellow-citizens of Glasgow, and placed me with solemnity In the Tower of their Cathedral. My function Was announced by the impress on my bosom, Me audito venius Doctrinam Sanctam ut Discos, And I was taught to proclaim the hours of unheeded time.
Page 99 - In wedlock bands all ye who join ; with hands your hearts unite ; So shall our tuneful tongues combine to laud the nuptial rite.
Page 10 - Humphry Symsin gave xx pound to buy this bell, And the parish gave xx more to make this ring go well.
Page 40 - they are vastly fond of great noises that fill the ear, such as the firing of cannon, beating of drums, and the ringing of bells ; so that it is common for a number of them that have got a glass in their heads to get up into some belfry and ring the bells for hours together for the sake of exercise.
Page 52 - L'Estrange himself, being my brother-in-law. Such other reports I have often in times past heard, touching some other parts of that kingdom ; but (as I said) I then regarded them not, and will not therefore now speak anything of them. At the end of queen Mary's days (Calais being taken), sir Hugh Paulet pulled down the bells of the churches of Jersey ; and sending them to S. Malo's, in Bretagne, fourteen of them were drowned at the entrance of that harbour. Whereupon it is a. bye-word at this day...
Page 45 - Let awful silence first proclaimed be, And Praise unto the Holy Trinity ; Then Honour give unto our noble King, So with a blessing let us raise this ring. Hark how the chirping treble sings most clear, And covering Tom comes rowling in the rear ; And now the bells are up, come let us see, What laws are best to keep sobriety. Who swears, or curses, or in choleric...

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