Frontiers of the State in the Late Ottoman Empire: Transjordan, 1850-1921

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 11, 2002 - History - 292 pages
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Until the mid-nineteenth century, Transjordan was a frontier region of the Ottoman province of Syria. In a time of European challenges to Ottoman integrity, the region's strategic location, linking Syria to Palestine and Arabia, motivated the Ottoman state to extend direct rule over this region. Using new archival material from Ottoman, Arabic and European sources, Eugene Rogan documents the case of Transjordan to provide a theoretically informed and articulate account of how the Ottoman state restructured and redefined itself during the last decades of its empire. In so doing, he explores the idea of frontier as a geographical and cultural boundary, and sheds light on the processes of state formation which ultimately led to the creation of the Middle East as it is defined today. The book concludes with an examination of the Ottoman legacy in the modern state of Jordan. Awarded both the Albert Hourani Book Award and the Turkish Studies Association Koprulu Prize at the Middle East Studies Association conference in November 2000.
  

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Contents

VI
1
VII
21
VIII
44
IX
70
X
93
XI
120
XII
158
XIII
182
XIV
216
XV
239
XVI
254
XVII
265
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About the author (2002)

Eugene L. Rogan is University Lecturer in the Modern History of the Middle East and a Fellow of St Antony's College, University of Oxford. He is the author of Frontiers of the State in the Late Ottoman Empire (1999) and editor of Outside In: On the Margins of the Modern Middle East (2002). He is editor of The Contemporary Middle East series published by Cambridge.

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