Efficiency and Empire (Google eBook)

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Methuen & Company, 1901 - Civil service - 315 pages
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Page 189 - For, behold, we were binding sheaves in the field, and, lo, my sheaf arose, and also stood upright ; and, behold, your sheaves stood round about, and made obeisance to my sheaf.
Page 307 - Methinks I see in my mind a noble and puissant nation rousing herself, like a strong man after sleep, and shaking her invincible locks...
Page 258 - Their Lordships feel it their bounden duty to discourage to the utmost of their ability the employment of steam vessels, as they consider that the introduction of steam is calculated to strike a fatal blow at the naval supremacy of the Empire.* Was this the supreme example of crass obscurantism, or a farseeing and intelligent appraisal of the future?
Page 180 - Britain with foreign parts, and with the language and municipal laws of the country wherein he resides. Further, it is his duty to protect his countrymen in the lawful exercise of their trade, to quiet their differences, to obtain the redress of injuries done them — failing which, to report the matter to the English...
Page 207 - War," and also nominally Secretary of State for the Colonies; but the Departments of War and the Colonies were not actually united until 1801, when Lord Hobart was created Secretary of State for the War and Colonial Department. From 1794 the " Committee for Trade and Foreign Plantations" (now known as the Board of Trade) gradually ceased to have any connection with Colonial affairs.
Page 85 - The Sacrament of the Lord's Supper was not by Christ's ordinance reserved, carried about, lifted up, or worshipped.
Page 217 - Department are sufficiently diversified may be seen by the following brief résumé of the subjects with which it deals. It prepares and issues the letters on matters relating to postal affairs, copyright, telegraph and commercial business, university examiners, military commissions, replies to circulars, governors' pensions, naval cadetships, flags, precedence, civil service uniform, foreign orders, together with general correspondence respecting colonial defence, and the passing of charters, letters...
Page 181 - ... of the country wherein he resides. Further, it is his duty to protect his countrymen in the lawful exercise of their trade, to quiet their differences, to obtain the redress of injuries done them— failing which, to report the matter to the English ambassador at the court of that nation — and to forward to the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs an annual return of the trade carried on at the different ports within his consulate, as well as a quarterly account of the market prices of agricultural...
Page 269 - WHEREAS the prosperity, strength, and safety of this United Kingdom and Her Majesty's dominions do greatly depend on a large, constant, and ready supply of seamen ; and it is therefore expedient to promote the increase of the number of seamen, and to afford them all due encouragement and protection...
Page 8 - ... be read at the head of every regiment in his service, and inserted in all regimental orderly books, with a view, of its becoming a lasting memorial of the fatal consequences to which officers expose themselves, who, in the discharge of the important duties confided to them, are deficient in that zeal, judgment, and personal exertion, which their sovereign, and their country, have aright to expect from officers entrusted with high commands.

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