Collected Short Stories

Front Cover
Lulu.com, 2008 - Fiction - 668 pages
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Herbert George Wells (21 September 1866 - 13 August 1946), better known as H. G. Wells, was an English writer most famous today for the science fiction novels he published between 1895 and 1901: The Time Machine, The Island of Doctor Moreau, The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds, When the Sleeper Wakes, and The First Men in the Moon. He was a prolific writer of both fiction and non-fiction, and produced works in many genres, including contemporary novels, history, and social commentary. Only his early science fiction novels are widely read today. Wells and Jules Verne are each sometimes referred to as "The Father of Science Fiction".
  

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Contents

THE TIME MACHINE AND OTHER STORIES
5
A Vision ofJudgment
18
The Beautiful Suit also known as A Moonlight Fable
44
The Pearl of Love
57
THE STOLEN BACILLUS AND OTHER STORIES
79
The Flowering of the Strange Orchid
85
In the Avu Observatory
92
The Triumphs of a Taxidermist
98
The Treasure in the Forest
166
THE PLATTNER STORY AND OTHERS
173
The Argonauts of the
187
The Story of the Late Mr Elvesham
196
In the Abyss
209
The Apple
221
Under the Knife
228
The Sea Raiders
238

Through a Window
105
The Temptation of Harringay
112
The Diamond Maker
122
Aepyornis Island
128
The Remarkable Case ofDavidsons Eyes
145
The Hammerpond Park Burglary
152
The Moth
158
Pollock and the Porroh
246
The Red Room is also known as The Ghost ofFear
265
The Purple Pileus
274
The Jilting ofJane
283
A Catastrophe
297
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, England, the son of an unsuccessful merchant. After a limited education, he was apprenticed to a dry-goods merchant, but soon found he wanted something more out of life. He read widely and got a position as a student assistant in a secondary school, eventually winning a scholarship to the College of Science in South Kensington, where he studied biology under the British biologist and educator, Thomas Henry Huxley. After graduating, Wells took several different teaching positions and began writing for magazines. When his stories began to sell, he left teaching to write full time. Wells's first major novel, The Time Machine (1895), launched his career as a writer, and he began to produce a steady stream of science-fiction tales, short stories, realistic novels, and books of sociology, history, science, and biography, producing one or more books a year. Much of Wells's work is forward-looking, peering into the future of prophesy social and scientific developments, sometimes with amazing accuracy. Along with French writer Jules Verne, Wells is credited with popularizing science fiction, and such novels as The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds (1898) are still widely read. Many of Wells's stories are based on his own experiences. The History of Mr. Polly (1910) draws on the life of Wells's father. Kipps (1905) uses Wells's experience as an apprentice, and Love and Mr. Lewisham (1900) draws on Wells's experiences as a school teacher. Wells also wrote stories showing how the world could be a better place. One such story is A Modern Utopia (1905). As a writer, Wells's range was exceptionally wide and his imagination extremely fertile. While time may have caught up with him (many of the things he predicted have already come to pass), he remains an interesting writer because of his ability to tell a lively tale.

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