The History of Scotland, and an Historical Disquisition Concerning Ancient India (Google eBook)

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Baudry's European library, 1835 - 695 pages
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Page 501 - THE ANCIENTS HAD OF INDIA ; and the Progress of Trade with that Country prior to the Discovery of the Passage to it by the Cape of Good Hope.
Page 661 - Distinctions of colour are of his ordination. It is he who gives existence. In your temples, to his name the voice is raised in prayer : in a house of images, where the bell is shaken, still he is the object of adoration.
Page 591 - From that time, like everything else which falls into the hands of the Mussulman, it has been going to ruin, and the discovery of the passage to India by the Cape of Good Hope gave the deathblow to its commercial greatness.
Page x - But now the great map of mankind is unrolled at once, and there is no state or gradation of barbarism, and no mode of refinement, which we have not at the same moment under our view...
Page ix - But my delay was only to render my obligation to you more complete, and my thanks, if possible, more merited. The close of the session brought a great deal of very troublesome, though not important business on me at once. I could not go through your work at one breath...
Page iii - On one occasion, (when the capital of Scotland was in danger of falling into the hands of the Rebels,) the state of public affairs appeared so critical, that he thought himself justified in laying aside, for a time, the pacific habits of his profession, and in quitting his parochial residence at Gladsmuir, to join the Volunteers of Edinburgh : and when, at last, it was determined that the city should be surrendered, he was one of the small band who repaired to Haddington, and offered their services...
Page 318 - ... their anguish ; but no sooner did Kent and Shrewsbury withdraw, than they ran to their mistress, and burst out into the most passionate expressions of tenderness and sorrow.
Page 389 - His bad deportment is incurable ; nor can there ever be any good expected from him, for several reasons, which I might tell you was I present with you. I cannot pretend to foretell how all may turn ; but I will say, that matters cannot subsist long as they are, without being accompanied with sundry bad consequences.
Page 310 - England, (said she,) an independent "sovereign, " to implore the queen's assistance, not to subject " myself to her authority. Nor is my spirit so " broken by past misfortunes, or so intimidated " by present dangers} as to stoop to any thing " unbecoming the majesty of a crowned head, or ** that will disgrace the ancestors from whom I am " descended, and the son to whom I shall leave
Page 258 - Elizabeth's protection that it was scarcely possible for them to refuse putting into her hands a person who had taken up arms against her ; but, as a sum of money was paid on that account, and shared between Morton and...

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