State papers and publick documents of the United States, from the accession of George Washington to the presidency: exhibiting a complete view of our foreign relations since that time ... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Printed and published by Thomas B. Wait, 1819 - United States
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 36 - Lawrence ; comprehending all islands within twenty leagues of any part of the shores of the United States, and lying between lines to be drawn due east from the points where the aforesaid boundaries between Nova Scotia on the one part, and East Florida on the other, shall respectively touch the Bay of Fundy and the Atlantic Ocean ; excepting such islands as now are, or heretofore have been, within the limits of the said province of Nova Scotia.
Page 478 - St. Croix River to the highlands; along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St. Lawrence, from those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean, to the northwesternmost head of Connecticut River...
Page 36 - East, by a line to be drawn along the middle of the river St. Croix, from its mouth in the Bay of Funcly to its source, and from its source directly north to the aforesaid Highlands, which divide the rivers that fall into the Atlantic Ocean from those which fall into the river St. Lawrence...
Page 102 - Affaires of the United States at Madrid, from the local acquaintance which he must have acquired with persons and circumstances, would be an useful and proper member of the commission: but that it would be useful, also, to join with him some person more particularly acquainted with the circumstances of the navigation to be treated of. " That the fund appropriated by the act providing the means of intercourse between the United States and foreign nations, will insufficiently furnish the ordinary and...
Page 144 - ... breadth and length, from its source to the sea, and expressly that part which is between the said island of New Orleans and the right bank of that river, as well as the passage both in and out of its mouth: It is further stipulated, that the vessels belonging to the subjects of either nation shall not be stopped, visited, or subjected to the payment of any duty whatsoever.
Page ii - District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the seventh day of May, AD 1828, in the fifty-second year of the Independence of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SG Goodrich, of the said District, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit...
Page 124 - To the Secretary of the United States for the Department of Foreign Affairs...
Page 78 - ... applauded and celebrated (so to express it) all over France, as so many crowns conferred on genius and virtue. Even then the sentiment of our rights existed in the bottom of our souls. It was easily perceived, that it feelingly mingled in the interest which we took in behalf of America, and in the public vows, which we preferred for your liberty. At last the hour of the French has arrived : we love to think, that the citizens of the United States have not regarded with indifference our first...
Page 463 - Lieutenant General and Commander in Chief of all the Armies raised or to be raised for the Service of the United States.
Page 108 - That the bona fide manufactures and productions of the United States (tobacco only excepted, which shall continue under its present regulations) may be imported in American or Spanish vessels into any...

Bibliographic information