The rhetorical class book; or, The principles and practice of elocution defined; with selections from popular writers [ed.] by H. Innes (Google eBook)

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Henry Innes (teacher of elocution)
1834
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Page 16 - To sit on rocks, to muse o'er flood and fell, To slowly trace the forest's shady scene, Where things that own not man's dominion dwell, And mortal foot hath ne'er or rarely been ; To climb the trackless mountain all unseen, With the wild flock that never needs a fold ; Alone o'er steeps and foaming falls to lean ; This is not solitude ; 'tis but to hold Converse with Nature's charms, and view her stores unroll'd.
Page 220 - Why should that name be sounded more than yours ? Write them together, yours is as fair a name ; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well ; Weigh them, it is as heavy ; conjure with 'em, Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.
Page 213 - War, he sung, is toil and trouble, Honour but an empty bubble; Never ending, still beginning, Fighting still, and still destroying; If the world be worth thy winning, Think, O think, it worth enjoying: Lovely Thais sits beside thee, Take the good the gods provide thee ! — The many rend the skies with loud applause; So Love was crown'd, but Music won the cause.
Page 255 - Unskilful he to note the card Of prudent lore, Till billows rage, and gales blow hard, And whelm him o'er ! Such fate to suffering worth is...
Page 214 - And unburied remain Inglorious on the plain: Give the vengeance due To the valiant crew! Behold how they toss their torches on high, How they point to the Persian abodes And glittering temples of their hostile gods. The princes applaud with a furious joy: And the king seized a flambeau with zeal to destroy; Thais led the way To light him to his prey, And like another Helen, fired another Troy!
Page 42 - Ye stars ! which are the poetry of Heaven ! If in your bright leaves we would read the fate Of men and empires, —'tis to be forgiven, That, in our aspirations to be great, Our destinies o'erleap their mortal state. And claim a kindred with you; for ye are A beauty and a mystery, and create In us such love and reverence from afar, That fortune, fame, power, life, have named themselves a star.
Page 57 - Sport that wrinkled Care derides, And Laughter holding both his sides. Come, and trip it, as you go, On the light fantastic toe; And in thy right hand lead with thee The mountain nymph, sweet Liberty ; And if I give thee honour due, Mirth, admit me of thy crew, To live with her, and live with thee, In unreproved pleasures free...
Page 212 - Changed his hand and checked his pride. He chose a mournful muse Soft pity to infuse : He sung Darius great and good, By too severe a fate Fallen, fallen, fallen, fallen, Fallen from his high estate, And weltering in his blood ; Deserted, at his utmost need, By those his former bounty fed ; On the bare earth exposed he lies With not a friend to close his eyes.
Page 79 - Tis the sunset of life gives me mystical lore, And coming events cast their shadows before.
Page 267 - And as the soldiers bore dead bodies by, He call'd them untaught knaves, unmannerly, To bring a slovenly, unhandsome corse Betwixt the wind and his nobility.

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