The World that Trade Created: Society, Culture, and the World Economy, 1400 to the Present

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M.E. Sharpe, 2006 - History - 285 pages
33 Reviews
Why are railroad tracks separated by the same four feet, eight inches as ancient Roman roads? How did 19th-century Europeans turn mountains of bird excrement from Peru into mountains of gold? Where has most of the world's oil come from in the 20th century?

This new edition of The World That Trade Created reveals the answers to dozens of tantalizing questions like these. In a series of brief, highly readable vignettes the authors bring to life international trade and its actors--including migrants and merchants, pirates and privateers, sailors and slaves, traders and tree-tappers. In the process they make clear that the seemingly modern concept of economic globalization has deep historical roots. The authors also demonstrate that economic activity cannot be divorced from social and cultural contexts.

The second edition provides enhanced coverage of Africa, the Middle East, and the 20th century, and features eighteen new vignettes, including two new pieces on oil.

  

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Review: The World That Trade Created: Society, Culture, and the World Economy, 1400 to the Present (Sources and Studies in World History)

User Review  - Colin Macdonald - Goodreads

Really interesting, but kinda hard to digest. It's a collection of short essays, grouped loosely by topic. Each one is quick overview of a topic, so the whole is very high-density. It covers many ... Read full review

Review: The World That Trade Created: Society, Culture, and the World Economy, 1400 to the Present (Sources and Studies in World History)

User Review  - Robert Morris - Goodreads

Loved it. Fantastic book. This sat on my shelf for years because of its dull academic trade dress. When I finally took it down last month I was first pleasantly surprised, then fascinated, and then ... Read full review

Contents

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About the author (2006)

Steven Topik is professor of history at the University of California, Irvine. Kenneth Pomeranz is Chancellor's Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine, where he has taught since 1988.

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