Constantine, Divine Emperor of the Christian Golden Age

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Cambridge University Press, 2012 - Art - 440 pages
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Constantine, Divine Emperor of the Christian Golden Age offers a radical reassessment of Constantine as an emperor, a pagan, and a Christian. The book examines in detail a wide variety of evidence, including literature, secular and religious architectural monuments, coins, sculpture, and other works of art. Setting the emperor in the context of the kings and emperors who preceded him, Jonathan Bardill shows how Constantine's propagandists exploited the traditional themes and imagery of rulership to portray him as having been elected by the supreme solar God to save his people and inaugurate a brilliant golden age. The author argues that the cultivation of this image made it possible for Constantine to reconcile the long-standing tradition of imperial divinity with his monotheistic faith by assimilating himself to Christ.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 A Change of Image
11
2 Emperors and Divine Protectors
28
3 The Saving Ruler and the LogosNomos
126
4 The Hippodrome Procession
151
5 The Symbol from the Sun the Standard and the Sarcophagus
159
6 The Roman Colossus
203
7 Constantine and Christianity
218
8 Sol and Christianity
326
9 Constantine as Christ
338
Epilogue
397
Bibliography
401
Index
425
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Jonathan Bardill has held fellowships at Oxford University, Dumbarton Oaks, Newcastle University and Koç University's Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations, Istanbul. He has contributed articles to numerous archaeological and historical journals, including the American Journal of Archaeology, the Journal of Roman Archaeology and Dumbarton Oaks Papers, as well as several edited volumes, including Social and Political Life in Late Antiquity and The Oxford Handbook of Byzantine Studies. He is the author of the reference work Brickstamps of Constantinople.

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