Harmony: Its Theory and Practice (Google eBook)

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Augener & Company, 1903 - Harmony - 342 pages
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Page 169 - ... inversion above but with no note doubled: this chord rates as 1 and so may be regarded as usable in sequence. As Prout notes (p. 169), it is the leading tone seventh chord in a minor key that is of first importance; this is indeed the chord of the diminished 7th chord (section 17), "the chief derivation of the chord of the ninth and its most frequently used form.
Page 326 - ... the system of Scales, Modes, and Harmonic Tissues does not rest solely upon inalterable natural laws, but is at least partly also the result of esthetical principles, which have already changed, and will still further change, with the progressive development of humanity.
Page 133 - With regard to the first kind, it is impossible to give a hard and fast rule as to...
Page 71 - Though it is possible to take any triad in its second inversion, the employment of any but primary triads in this position is extremely rare. " This same tabulation is in entire agreement with the following rule (P., p. 71): "The best note to double in a second inversion is not the root of the chord, even when this is a primary note. . . . The bass note itself is almost always the best note to double; but it is possible, and occasionally even advisable, to double either the third or the root of the...
Page 161 - ... inversions appear in successive lines. The statement to be considered in the light of all these results is the following (P., p. 161): "The seventh is almost always either present in the chord or, if not, it is added when the ninth is resolved. ... In the root position it is generally the fifth that is omitted; but if the root be not in the bass, it is seldom present at all. Inversions of the chord of the ninth are therefore very rare ..." Evidently this statement corroborates the tabulation,...
Page 14 - European tonal system, we shall assume that the whole mass of tones and the connection of harmonies must stand in a close and always distinctly perceptible relationship to some arbitrarily selected tonic, and that the mass of tone which forms the whole compo- IT sitian, must be developed from this tonic, and must finally return to it.
Page iii - The rules were all his very obedient humble servants;' and when we find that in our own time Wagner, or Brahms, or Dvorak, breaks some rule given in old...
Page 14 - Helmholtz describe it, tonality is "that the whole mass of tones and the connection of harmonies must stand in a close and always distinctly perceptible relation to some arbitrarily selected tonic, and that the mass of tone which forms the whole composition, must be developed from this tonic, and must finally return to it.
Page 66 - It appears, therefore, that the second inversions of the minor and diminished triads (the latter taken as a derivative of V7), are not even passable, even if the best note is doubled and no note is omitted. This is in agreement with the observation (P., p. 66): "Though it is possible to take any triad in its second inversion, the employment of any but primary triads in this position is extremely rare.
Page 39 - ... conformity with the rule (P., p. 39) : "One note of a triad is sometimes omitted. This is mostly the fifth of the chord very rarely the third ..." It will be noted that all of the triads have passable forms if the fifth is omitted. This latter fact justifies the use of such chords as stated (P., p. 39); "But it not infrequently becomes necessary to omit the fifth, in order to secure a better progression of the parts.

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