'The Furie of the Ordnance': Artillery in the English Civil Wars

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Boydell & Brewer Ltd, 2008 - History - 247 pages
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NEW LOW PRICE The English Civil War has frequently been depicted as a struggle between Cavaliers and Roundheads in which technology played little part. The first-hand sources now tell us that this romantic picture is deeply flawed - revealing a reality of gunpowder, artillery, and a grinding struggle of siege and starvation. As with naval warfare, developments in gun technology drastically changed land warfare in the years leading up to 1642. The Civil War was itself shaped largely by the availability of munitions. A failure to procure them in 1643 and 1644 - combined with abortive attempts on London - ultimately proved the downfall of the Royalists. Moreover a final move away from fortified local garrisons reshaped both the nature of warfare in England, and the country itself. STEPHEN BULL is Curator of Military History and Archaeology, Lancashire Museums.
  

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Contents

Of guns and gunners
1
Artillery Supply under the Early Stuarts
38
The War of Ordnance logistics
54
Artillery Fortifications
81
Artillery and Sieges
100
Battle
137
Conclusions
161
Shot finds
175
The establishment of the Kings Trayne of Artillery June 1643
181
The ideal artillery train
188
glossary
195
Bibliography
225
index
245
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Dr Stephen Bull is the Curator of the Museum of Lancashire in Preston, which incorporates the collections of several local regiments. Born in 1960, he graduated from the University of Wales with a BA (Hons) in history in 1981, and obtained his doctorate from University College, Swansea, with a study of English Civil War weapons. For several years from 1984 he worked at the National Army Museum, on a fortifications project and later in the Weapons Department. He has written numerous articles for specialist journals, including a number on the weapons and tactics of World War I. The author lives in Pr

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