Worthies of Buckinghamshire and Men of Note of that County (Google eBook)

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Author, 1888 - Buckinghamshire (England) - 431 pages
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Page 311 - This Book of Articles before rehearsed is again approved, and allowed to be holden and executed within the realm, by the assent and consent of our Sovereign Lady Elizabeth, by the Grace of God, of England, France, and Ireland, Queen, Defender of the Faith, &c.
Page 81 - House of Parliament, whose trust he has betrayed. I impeach him in the name of the English nation, whose ancient honour he has sullied. I impeach him in the name of the people of India, whose rights he has trodden under foot, and whose country he has turned into a desert. Lastly, in the name of human nature itself, in the name of both sexes, in the name of every age, in the name of every rank, I impeach the common enemy and oppressor of all!
Page 34 - I have experienced. I have begun several times many things, and I have often succeeded at last. I shall sit down now ; but the time will come when you will hear me.
Page 388 - I have eaten his bread, and served him near thirty years, and will not do so base a thing as to forsake him; and choose rather to lose my life (which I am sure I shall do) to preserve and defend those things which are against my conscience to preserve and defend : for I will deal freely with you, I have no reverence for the bishops, for whom this quarrel [subsists.]" It was not a time to dispute; and his affection to the church had never been suspected.
Page 146 - This person, having filled a public station in the former times, lived now a private and retired life in London; and, having wholly lost his sight, kept always a man to read to him, which usually was the son of some gentleman of his acquaintance, whom in kindness he took to improve in his learning.
Page 282 - Milton should, in our time, be so little read. As compositions, they deserve the attention of every man who wishes to become acquainted with the full power of the English language. They abound with passages compared with which the finest declamations of Burke sink into insignificance. They are a perfect field of cloth of gold. The style is stiff with gorgeous embroidery.
Page 37 - Protection appears to be in about the same condition that Protestantism was in 1828. The country will draw its moral. For my part, if we are to have free trade, I, who honour genius, prefer that such measures should be proposed by the honourable member for Stockport, than by one who, through skilful Parliamentary manoeuvres, has tampered with the generous confidence of a great people and of a great party.
Page 409 - Wilkes, esq. herewith sent you, for being the author and publisher of a most infamous and seditious libel, intitled, The North Briton, No 45, tending to inflame the minds and alienate the affections of the people from his majesty, and to excite them to traitorous insurrections against the government...
Page 125 - Cooper's Hill is the work that confers upon him the rank and dignity of an original author. He seems to have been, at least among us, the author of a species of composition that may be denominated local poetry, of which the fundamental subject is some particular landscape, to be poetically described, with the addition of such embellishments as may be supplied by historical retrospection or incidental meditation.
Page 147 - Regained," and in a pleasant tone said to me, "This is owing to you, for you put it into my head by the question you put to me at Chalfont, which before I had not thought of.

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