Worlds Within Worlds: Structures of Life in Sixteenth-Century London

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 4, 2002 - Business & Economics - 468 pages
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The enormous growth of London during the early modern period brought with it major social problems, yet, as Steve Rappaport demonstrates in this innovative study, Tudor London was essentially a stable society, subject to stress but never seriously threatened by widespread popular unrest or other forms of instability. Professor Rappaport looks once again at the nature, causes, and effects of the principal threats to the capital's stability in the sixteenth century - the threefold increase in population, the economic impact of such demographic expansion, the substantial rise in prices and the inequitable distribution of wealth and power - and concludes that historians have hitherto exaggerated the severity of such problems and over-simplified their effects. Professor Rappaport's researches suggest that the institutional superstructure of the capital was more adaptable, its small social organisations more resilient, and opportunities for social mobility far greater than many historians have acknowledged. Worlds Within Worlds combines sophisticated quantitative analysis with vivid empirical detail, and mounts a major challenge to much current thinking about urban life in early modern Britain.
  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
Early modern Londons alleged instability
6
THE NATURE AND EXTENT OF CITIZENSHIP
23
Every freemen shall be of some mystery or trade
29
The status of women
36
Repression of foreigners and strangers
42
Extension of the freedom in Henriciar London
47
Renewal of tensions in Elizabethan London
54
The importance of the companies
184
The companies role in resolving conflict
201
STRUCTURAL INEQUALITY
215
The yeomanry
219
Apprentices
232
journeymen and householders
238
liverymen and assistants
250
The distribution of men and wealth in companies
273

THE GROWTH OF POPULATION
61
Life expectancy and mortality
67
The capitals magnetism in early modern England
76
DEMOGRAPHIC GROWTH AND TUDOR LONDONS ECONOMYY
87
The decline of the clothfinishing industry
96
Too many foreigners apprentices and encroachers of handicrafts
104
Some causes of unemployment and its extent in Elizabethan London
117
THE STANDARD OF LIVING
123
The price revolution
130
Trends in the prices of consumables
138
Trends in nominal and real wages
145
The effects of rising prices in sixteenthcentury London
153
THE SUBSTRUCTURE OF SOCIETY
162
Limitations of Londons central government
176
PATTERNS OF MOBILITY
285
Apprenticeship
291
The transition to adulthood
322
The occupational career
329
The company career
345
Making it in Tudor London
363
SOCIAL STABILITY IN SIXTEENTHCENTURY LONDON
377
1 Estimate of the age structure of Londons male population in the middle of the sixteenth century1
388
2 Numbers of apprentices admissions and shopowners in livery companies 14909 to 16009
394
3 Prices and wages in London 1490 to 1609
401
Bibliography
408
Index
431
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About the author (2002)

Joe Plummer, PhD, is the Chief Research Officer at The Advertising Research Foundation and recipient of the 2006 Distinguished Marketer Award from the Academy of Marketing Science. He was previously executive vice president for McCann-Erickson WorldGroup.

Steve Rappaport is the Director of Knowledge Solutions at The Advertising Research Foundation.

Taddy Hall is the Chief Strategy Officer at The Advertising Research Foundation and a well-known authority in the fields of innovation and strategy.

Robert Barocci is the President/CEO of The Advertising Research Foundation. He was previously president of Leo Burnett International.

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