"Story of the Galveston Flood." (Google eBook)

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Woodward, 1900 - Storms - 366 pages
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Page 265 - The other cars were treated in the same way, and in almost less time than it takes to tell it the contents of that train were inside the Elevator.
Page 100 - ... man was big and muscular, one of the women was old and one was young. They were dipping in a heap of rubbish, and when they heard my footsteps the man turned an evil, glowering face upon me and the young woman hid something in the folds of her dress. Human ghouls, these, prowling in search of prey. narrow street, and I looked back and saw the negro running, with a crowd at his heels. The crowd caught him and would have killed him but a policeman came up. They tied his hands and took him through...
Page 51 - ... crashing all around them, men, women and children were huddled in buildings, caught like rats, expecting to be crushed to death or drowned in the sea, yet cut off from escape. Buildings were torn down, burying their hundreds, and were swept inland, piling up great heaps of wreckage. Hundreds of people were thrown into the water in the height of the storm, some to meet instant death, others to struggle for a time in vain, and thousands of others to escape death in most miraculous and marvelous...
Page 48 - ... over the island. Men who had delayed starting for home, hoping for an abatement of the storm, concluded that the storm had grown worse and went out in that howling, raging, furious storm, wading through water almost to their necks, dodging flying missiles swept by a wind blowing 100 miles an hour. building could withstand them and none wholly escaped injury. Others were picked up at sea. And all during the terrible storm acts of the greatest heroism were performed. Hundreds and hundreds of brave...
Page 121 - The entire remainder of the population is suffering in a greater or less degree. Not a single church, school or charitable institution, of which Galveston had so many, is left intact. Not a building escaped damage, and half the whole number were entirely obliterated. There is immediate need for food, clothing and household goods of all kinds. If nearby cities will open asylums for women and children, the situation will be greatly relieved. Coast cities should send us water, as well as provisions,...
Page 51 - The most intense and anxious time was between 8.30 and 9 o'clock, with raging seas rolling around them, with a wind so terrific that none could hope to escape its fury, with roofs...
Page 47 - ... that try men's souls and sicken their hearts. The storm at sea is terrible, but there are no such dreadful consequences as those which have followed the storm on the sea coast and it is men who passed through the terrors of the storm, who faced death for hours, men ruined in property and bereft of families, who took up the herculean and well-nigh impossible task of bringing order out of chaos, of caring for the living and disposing of the dead before they made life impossible here. The storm...
Page 92 - A little farther on we saw a group of strange driftwood. "We looked closer and found it to be a mass of wooden slabs, with names and dates cut upon them, and floating on top of them were marble stones, two of them. "The graveyard, which has held the sleeping .citizens of Galveston for many, many years, was giving up its dead. We pulled up at a little wharf in the hush of the starlight; there were no lights anywhere in the city, except a few scattered lamps shining from a few desolate, half-destroyed...
Page 90 - We sat on the deck of the little steamer. The four men from out-of-town cities and I listened to the little boat's wheel plowing its way through the calm waters of the bay. The stars shone down like a benediction, but along the line of the shore there rose a great leaping column of blood-red flame. "What a terrible fire !" I said. "Some of the large buildings must be burning.
Page 131 - Washington, September 10. Hon. JD Sayers, Governor of Texas, Austin, Texas : The reports of the great calamity which has befallen Galveston and other points on the coast of Texas excite my profound sympathy for the sufferers, as they will stir! the hearts of the whole country. Whatever help it is possible to give shall be gladly extended. Have directed the Secretary of War to supply rations and tents upon your request. A copy of this telegram was sent to the Mayor of Galveston as well as to Governor...

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