Vathek, by W. Beckford. [Tr. by S. Henley. Followed by] The castle of Otranto, by H. Walpole [and] The bravo of Venice, tr. from the Germ. [of J.H.D. Zschokke] by M.G. Lewis (Google eBook)

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1834
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Page 117 - But such as, at this day, to Indians known; In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
Page 117 - PER me si va nella cittą dolente, Per me si va nell' eterno dolore, Per me si va tra la perduta gente. Giustizia mosse il mio alto fattore : Fecemi la divina potestate, La somma sapienza e il primo amore. Dinanzi a me non fur cose create, Se non eterne, ed io eterno duro : Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch...
Page 113 - Surely men of low degree are vanity, and men of high degree are a lie: to be laid in the balance, they are altogether lighter than vanity.
Page 112 - The pride of thine heart hath deceived thee, thou that dwellest in the clefts of the rock, whose habitation is high; that saith in his heart, Who shall bring me down to the ground? Though thou exalt thyself as the eagle, and though thou set thy nest among the stars, thence will I bring thee down, saith the LORD.
Page 125 - Not equal, as their sex not equal seem'd: For contemplation he and valour form'd; For softness she, and sweet attractive grace; He for God only, she for God in him; His fair large front and eye sublime declar'd Absolute rule; and hyacinthine locks Round from his parted forelock manly hung Clust'ring, but not beneath his shoulders broad...
Page 145 - It was an attempt to blend the two kinds of romance, the ancient and the modern. In the former, all was imagination and improbability: in the latter, nature is always intended to be, and sometimes has been, copied with success.
Page 109 - I'll read you matter deep and dangerous ; As full of peril and adventurous spirit, As to o'er-walk a current, roaring loud, On the unsteadfast footing of a spear.
Page 121 - For, lo, the winter is past, The rain is over and gone; The flowers appear on the earth; The time of the singing of birds is come, And the voice of the turtle is heard in our land; The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, And the vines with the tender grape give a good smell, Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
Page 112 - Woe to him that coveteth an evil covetousness to his house, that he may set his nest on high, that he may be delivered from the power of evil!
Page 91 - ... at length, a hall of great extent, and covered with a lofty dome ; around which appeared fifty portals of bronze, secured with as many fastenings of iron. A funereal gloom prevailed over the whole scene. Here, upon two beds of incorruptible cedar, lay recumbent the fleshless forms of the preAdamite kings, who had been monarchs of the whole earth.

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