Comparative Criminal Justice Systems: A Topical Approach

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Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008 - Law - 472 pages
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Unique in its topical approach, this best-selling book examines systems of law, police, courts, and corrections by using more than 30 different countries to show the diversity in legal systems around the world. The book's organization helps readers understand the various ways policing, adjudication, and corrections systems can be organized and operated. This edition features more complete coverage of Islamic legal tradition, information on reform in Japan, more use of primary sources and updated material throughout. Fully updated to include more information on: The Patriot Act; Sunni and Shia Muslims; Substantive and procedural law changes for France, Germany, and Nigeria; Inquisitorial and adversarial systems; Trial under an inquisitorial proces; Juvenile justice system changes in England, Wales and China. Gives greater attention to the Islamic legal tradition and includes detailed descriptions of its key aspects. Reflect up-to-date events in Japanese criminal justice and covers changes that have been officially approved, but are not yet fully implemented. References the actual laws of many countries and provides additional information supplied by that country's criminal justice agency. Anyone interested in criminal justice across the world.

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User Review  - Terrance - Goodreads

Good way to learn about the criminal justice system in different cultures and countries. Read full review

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About the author (2008)

Philip L. Reichel earned his Ph.D. in sociology from Kansas State University and is currently Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Northern Colorado. He is the author of Comparative Criminal Justice Systems: A Topical Approach (6th ed., 2013), co-author of Corrections (2013), and co-editor of Human Trafficking: Exploring the International Nature, Concerns, and Complexities (2012). Dr. Reichel has also authored or co-authored more than 30 articles, book chapters, and encyclopedia entries. He has lectured at universities in Austria, Germany, and Poland; participated in a panel for the United Nations University; was a presenter for a United Nations crime prevention webinar; presented papers at side events during the United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (Brazil) and the United Nations Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (Vienna); and was an invited speaker at Zhejiang Police College in Hangzhou, China. He was asked to provide a contribution for an anthology of 14 esteemed scholars who have made a significant contribution to the discipline of criminal justice within a comparative/international context (Lessons From International Criminology/Comparative Criminology/Criminal Justice, 2004) and is an active member of the American Society of Criminology and the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, serving as a Trustee-at-large for the latter.

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