The Lucubrations of Isaac Bickerstaff, Esq, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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John Nutt, and sold by John Morphew, 1712 - English essays
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Page 35 - They had spent whole months thus, one injuring, the other complaining; when in the midst of this rage towards each other, they were commanded upon the attack of the castle, where the corporal received a shot in the thigh, and fell; the French pressing on, and he expecting to be trampled to death, called out to his enemy, "Ah, Valentine! Can you leave me here?
Page 35 - Ah, Valentine ! can you leave me here ?'• Valentine immediately ran back, and in the midst of a thick fire of the French took the corporal upon his back and brought him through all that danger as far as the Abbey of...
Page 252 - However low and poor the taking of snuff argues a man to be in his own stock of thoughts, or means to employ his brains and his fingers; yet there is a poorer creature in the world than he, and this is a borrower of snuff; a fellow that keeps no box of his own, but is always asking others for a pinch. Such poor rogues put me always in mind of a common phrase among school-boys when they are composing their exercise, who run to an upper scholar, and cry,
Page 215 - He is the most stupid of all my mother's children: he knows nothing of his book : when he should mind that, he is hiding or hoarding his taws and marbles, or laying up farthings. His way of thinking is...
Page 17 - After this declaration, if a fine lady thinks fit to giggle at church, or a great beau come in drunk to a play, either shall be sure to hear of it in my ensuing paper. For, merely as a well-bred man, I cannot bear these enormities.
Page 256 - ... accent of Christians, nor the gait of Christian, pagan, nor man, have so strutted, and bellowed, that I have thought some of Nature's journeymen had made men, and not made them well, they imitated humanity so abominably.
Page 16 - Homer, and the design of it, is a good representation of the age in which that comedy was written ; at which time love and wenching were the business of life, and the gallant manner of pursuing women was the best recommendation at Court.
Page 8 - Gentleman of a great estate fell desperately in love with a great Beauty of very high quality, but as ill-natured as long flattery and an habitual self-will could make her. However, my young Spark ventures upon her like a man of quality, without being acquainted with her, or having ever saluted her, until it was a crime to kiss any woman else.
Page 142 - I hear likewise, that there is a great desolation among the gentlemen and ladies who were the ornaments of the town, and used to shine in plumes and diadems ; the heroes being most of them pressed, and the queens beating hemp.
Page 9 - This, said he, I gave ten guineas for. The virtue of the enchanted liquor (said he that sold it) is such, that if the woman you marry proves a scold (which, it seems, my dear niece, is your misfortune; as it was your good mother's before you), let her hold three spoonfuls in her mouth for a full half hour after you come home...

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