The Murrow boys: pioneers on the front lines of broadcast journalism

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin, 1996 - Biography & Autobiography - 445 pages
15 Reviews
A close-up look at a talented group of foreign correspondents who transformed broadcast journalism--including Edward R. Murrow, Eric Sevaried, William L. Shirer, Charles Collingwood, and Howard K. Smith--and witnessed the corporate pressures and sensationalism that mark modern news.

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Review: The Murrow Boys: Pioneers on the Front Lines of Broadcast Journalism

User Review  - Cynthia - Goodreads

Fantastic study of pioneering journalists, by a famous journalist (stan cloud) and his wife, also a respected journalist. They did a fantastic job of not mythologizing these great and famous men (who ... Read full review

Review: The Murrow Boys: Pioneers on the Front Lines of Broadcast Journalism

User Review  - Nolly Cantey - Goodreads

I can still hear the voices Read full review

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Contents

Prologue
1
1945 1 The Voice of the Future
7
Murrow and Shirer
18
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Lynne Olson and Stanley Cloud are coauthors of The Murrow Boys,"" a biography of the correspondents whom Edward R. Murrow hired before and during World War II to create CBS News. Olson is the author of Freedom's Daughters: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement from 1830 to 1970. Cloud, a former Washington bureau chief for "Time," was also a national political correspondent, White House correspondent, Saigon bureau chief, and Moscow correspondent for "Time," Olson was a Moscow correspondent for the Associated Press and White House correspondent for the "Baltimore Sun," She and Cloud are married and live in Washington, D.C.

"From the Hardcover edition.

Writer Lynne Olson graduated from the University of Arizona and began her career with the Associated Press in 1971. She was its first woman correspondent in Moscow from 1974 to 1976. She also worked as a reporter on national politics for the Baltimore Sun before becoming a freelance writer in 1981. Olson has contributed to publications including the Washington Post, American Heritage, Smithsonian, Working Woman, Ms., Elle, and Glamour. She taught journalism at American University in Washington for five years and has published several books of history.