The Works of Shakespear in Eight Volumes: The Genuine Text (collated with All the Former Editions, and Then Corrected and Emended) is Here Settled: Being Restored from the Blunders of the First Editors, and the Interpolations of the Two Last: with a Comment and Notes, Critical and Explanatory (Google eBook)

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J. and P. Knapton, S. Birt, T. Longman and T. Shewell, H. Lintott, C. Hitch, J. Brindley, J. and R. Tonso and S. Droper, R. Wellington, E. New, and B. Dod., 1747
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Page 41 - Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.
Page 382 - Why, all the souls that were, were forfeit once ; • And He that might the vantage best have took, Found out the remedy : How would you be, If he, which is the top of judgment, should But judge you as you are ? O, think on that ; And mercy then will breathe within your lips, Like man new made.
Page lxviii - Triumph, my Britain, thou hast one to show To whom all scenes of Europe homage owe. He was not of an age, but for all time!
Page 21 - Know thus far forth. — By accident most strange, bountiful fortune, Now my dear lady, hath mine enemies Brought to this shore ; and by my prescience I find my zenith doth depend upon A most auspicious star, whose influence If now I court not, but omit, my fortunes Will ever after droop.
Page 366 - Stands at a guard with envy ; scarce confesses That his blood flows, or that his appetite Is more to bread than stone : hence shall we see, If power change purpose, what our seemers be.
Page 49 - Hence, bashful cunning ! And prompt me, plain and holy innocence ! I am your wife, if you will marry me ; If not, I'll die your maid : to be your fellow You may deny me ; but I'll be your servant, Whether you will or no.
Page 33 - All things in common, nature should produce Without sweat or endeavour : treason, felony, Sword, pike, knife, gun, or need of any engine, Would I not have ; but nature should bring forth, Of its own kind, all foison, all abundance, To feed my innocent people.
Page 153 - The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen ; man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report, what my dream was.
Page 155 - Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt: The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven; And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name.
Page 293 - The rest complains of cares to come. The flowers do fade, and wanton fields To wayward winter reckoning yields. A honey tongue, a heart of gall Is fancy's spring, but sorrow's fall. Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle...

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Internet Archive: Details: The works of Shakespear: in eight volumes
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A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H. 1, 79, July, The Tragedie of Cæsar and Pompey. Or Cæsars Reuenge. Priuately acted by the Studentes of Trinity Colledge in Oxford. ...
www.galeuk.com/ shakespeare/ TLHistorical.xls

EL LENGUAJE DE HENRY IV, PART iy PROBLEMAS QUE PLANTEA SU ...
UNIVERSIDAD DE EXTREMADURA. FACULTAD DE FILOSOFÍA Y LETRAS. Departamento de Filologías Inglesa y Alemana. EL LENGUAJE DE. HENRY IV, PART I ...
dialnet.unirioja.es/ servlet/ fichero_tesis?codigo=187& orden=0

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