The Downing Street years

Front Cover
HarperCollins, 1993 - Biography & Autobiography - 914 pages
19 Reviews
The appearance of Margaret Thatcher's memoirs has been one of the most eagerly awaited publishing events in many years. As this book now shows, rarely has such a sense of anticipation been so amply justified. The Downing Street Years is, first and foremost, a brilliant first-hand portrayal of the events and personalities of her years in power. She gives riveting accounts of the great and critical moments of her premiership - the three election victories, the Falklands War, the Miners' Strike, the Brighton Bomb, the Westland Affair, her battles abroad with foreign federalists and at home with faint-hearted or misguided ministers. Her judgements of the men and women she has encountered, whether world statesmen or Cabinet colleagues, are completely, sometimes brutally, frank. She is lavish with praise where it is due; devastating in her criticism when it is not. The book ends with an account of her last days which is as gripping as anything in thriller fiction. But The Downing Street Years is as much an argument as it is a record or a series of character portraits. No prime minister of modern times has sought to change Britain and its place in the world as radically as she did. Her government, she says, was about the application of a philosophy, not the implementation of an administrative programme. She sets out here with forcefulness and conviction the reasons for her beliefs and how she sought to turn them into action. Not the least interesting aspects of the book are the author's incidental insights into diplomacy ('the twin, opposing, temptations of statesmen are hubris and timidity'), political morality ('what is morally right often turns out to be politically expedient') and her ownstyle and tone ('once I begin to follow a train of thought, I am not easily stopped'). It is a work intensely - sometimes unconsciously - revealing of the mind and personality of its author. The impression which emerges is, as one recent commentator put it, of a world-class battleship at full steam ahead. Her thoroughness, her passion for change, her tenacity and her astonishing determination are evident in every chapter of the book.

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Review: The Downing Street Years

User Review  - Richard Thomas - Goodreads

Setting aside an instinctive reaction to summarise the book and its successor as I was right all along about everything, it is surprisingly good. Read full review

Review: The Downing Street Years

User Review  - Lize Fromely - Goodreads

Brilliant woman. Brilliant mind. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
3
Over the Shop
17
Changing Signals
38
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Margaret Thatcher became Britain's first woman Prime Minister in 1979, a post she held for eleven and a half years. She was leader of the Conservative Party for fifteen years, from 1975 to 1990. She was the only British Prime Minister of the twentieth century to win three consecutive general elections. Her partnership with President Ronald Reagan was the driving force of a conservative revolution that transformed the political landscape of the West, achieved a crushing defeat of Communism, and so brought liberty and prosperity within the grasp of millions who had never known them. Since leaving office, Mrs. Thatcher has written two volumes of memoirs -- "The Downing Street Years" and "The Path to Power". She has traveled extensively in America, Europe and Asia, delivering lectures on international issues and keeping in touch with world leaders. She also plays a continuing role in British political affairs. A