Revolutions of Race in English History, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Appleton, 1860 - Great Britain - 563 pages
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Page 404 - Be copy now to men of grosser blood, And teach them how to war. And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture; let us swear That you are worth your breeding; which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base That hath not noble lustre in your eyes.
Page 404 - Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead ! In peace, there's nothing so becomes a man, As modest stillness, and humility : But when the blast of war...
Page 132 - Thames, and the crews landed and took Canterbury and London by storm, and put to flight Beorhtwulf, king of the Mercians, with his army, and then went south over the Thames into Surrey ; and there king...
Page 552 - ... to our lord the king ; and that they be attached by their bodies, if they may be found, and brought before the king and his council, there to answer to the cases aforesaid, or that process be made against them, by...
Page 404 - And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture ; let us swear That you are worth your breeding : which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base, That hath not noble lustre in your eyes. I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,* Straining upon the start. The game's afoot ; Follow your spirit : and, upon this charge, Cry God for Harry ! England ! and Saint George ! [Exeunt . Alarum, and Chambers go off.
Page 404 - Now set the teeth and stretch the nostril wide, Hold hard the breath and bend up every spirit To his full height.
Page 336 - ... to make his eldest son a knight, and once to marry his eldest daughter ; and for this there shall be only paid a reasonable aid.
Page 432 - And ye shall understand, that I have put this book out of Latin into French, and translated it again out of French into English, that every man of my nation may understand it.
Page 239 - ... witnesses, who of their own knowledge, and without the aid of other testimony, afforded their evidence respecting the facts in question to the best of their belief. In its primitive form a trial by jury was therefore only a trial by witnesses...
Page 187 - ... industriously applied himself to build and extend the church of Christ in his kingdom ; wherein, when the bishop, who was not skilful in the English tongue, preached the gospel, it was most delightful to see the king himself interpreting the word of God to his commanders and ministers, for he had perfectly learned the language of the Scots during his long banishment.

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