The Works of Ben Jonson...: With Notes Critical and Explanatory, and a Biographical Memoir, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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G. and W. Nicol, 1816
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Contents

Section 20
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Section 21
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Section 22
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Section 23
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Section 24
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Section 25
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Section 26
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Section 27
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Page cclvii - I behold like a Spanish great galleon and an English man-of-war. Master Coleridge, like the former, was built far higher in learning, solid, but slow in his performances. CVL, with the English man-of-war, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about, and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.
Page lxvii - What things have we seen Done at the ' Mermaid ? ' Heard words that have been So nimble, and so full of subtle flame, As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest, And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life.
Page 124 - ... twenty score ; twenty score, that's two hundred ; two hundred a day, five days a thousand; forty thousand; forty times five, five times forty, two hundred days kills them all up by computation. And this will I venture my poor gentlemanlike carcass to perform, provided there be no treason practised upon us, by fair and discreet manhood; that is, civilly by the sword.
Page 67 - To be more prince) as may be. You are sad. Hub. Indeed, I have been merrier. Arth. Mercy on me! Methinks, nobody should be sad but I : Yet, I remember, when I was in France, Young gentlemen would be as sad as night, Only for wantonness.
Page cclxxxi - Shakespeare, who (taught by none) did first impart To Fletcher Wit, to labouring Jonson Art. He Monarch-like gave those his subjects law, And is that Nature which they paint and draw.
Page ccxcv - As for Jonson, to whose character I am now arrived, if we look upon him while he was himself (for his last plays were but his dotages), I think him the most learned and judicious writer which any theatre ever had. He was a most severe judge of himself, as well as others. One cannot say he wanted wit, but rather that he was frugal of it. In his works you find little to retrench or alter. Wit and language, and humour also in some measure, we had before him ; but something of art was wanting to the...
Page cxxvii - He's here in double trust : First, as I am his kinsman and his subject, Strong both against the deed ; then, as his host, Who should against his murderer shut the door, Not bear the knife myself.
Page cxxv - His judgment of stranger poets was, that he thought not Bartas a poet, but a verser, because he wrote not fiction. He cursed Petrarch for redacting verses into sonnets, which he said was like that tyrant's bed, where some who were too short were racked, others too long cut short.
Page lxi - O that Ben Jonson is a pestilent fellow, he brought up Horace giving the Poets a pill, but our fellow Shakespeare hath given him a purge that made him bewray his credit.
Page 9 - A fond opinion, that he cannot err. Myself was once a student; and, indeed, Fed with the self-same humour, he is now, Dreaming on nought but idle poetry, That fruitless, and unprofitable art, [Good unto none, but least to the professors,] Which, then, I thought the mistress of all knowledge: But since, time, and the truth have waked my judgement, And reason taught me better to distinguish, The vain, from th

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