Gettysburg--Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill (Google eBook)

Front Cover
UNC Press Books, Jul 2, 1993 - History - 528 pages
3 Reviews
In this companion to his celebrated earlier book, Gettysburg--The Second Day, Harry Pfanz provides the first definitive account of the fighting between the Army of the Potomac and Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia at Cemetery Hill and Culp's Hill--two of the most critical engagements fought at Gettysburg on 2 and 3 July 1863. Pfanz provides detailed tactical accounts of each stage of the contest and explores the interactions between--and decisions made by--generals on both sides. In particular, he illuminates Confederate lieutenant general Richard S. Ewell's controversial decision not to attack Cemetery Hill after the initial southern victory on 1 July. Pfanz also explores other salient features of the fighting, including the Confederate occupation of the town of Gettysburg, the skirmishing in the south end of town and in front of the hills, the use of breastworks on Culp's Hill, and the small but decisive fight between Union cavalry and the Stonewall Brigade.

!-- copy for pb reprint BR"Rich with astute judgments about officers on each side, clearly written, and graced with excellent maps, Pfanz's book is tactical history at its finest."--iCivil War
"A meticulous examination of the desperate engagements that over the course of the three days swept up and down the rough slopes of these two hills, the strategic anchors of the Union right flank."--New York Times Book Review

"The first and most comprehensive narrative yet written on this part of the battlefield. . . . Civil War enthusiasts should clear a space on their bookshelf for Gettysburg--Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill."--Blue and Gray

Harry Pfanz provides the definitive account of the fighting between the Army of the Potomac and Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia at Cemetery Hill and Culp's Hill--two of the most critical engagements fought at Gettysburg on 2 and 3 July 1863. He provides detailed tactical accounts of each stage of the contest and explores the interactions between--and decisions made by--generals on both sides. In particular, he illuminates Confederate lieutenant general Richard S. Ewell's controversial decision not to attack Cemetery Hill after the initial Southern victory on 1 July. -->
  

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Review: Gettysburg--Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill

User Review  - John - Goodreads

A little hard to read at times but a good book on a little know part of the battle. My great grandfather was there and that is why I read this book. Sometimes it was hard to follow what was happening but then battle was a hard fought battle that no one seemed to have a clear view of. Read full review

Review: Gettysburg--Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill

User Review  - Joe Owen - Goodreads

Excellent history of the bloody 3rd day of Battle before Pickett's charge. On Culp's Hill the 1st Maryland Infantry USA battled the 1st Maryland CSA, with ferocity. The Union regiment prevailed and ... Read full review

Contents

PREFACE
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
1TWO GENERALS AND THEIR ARMIES
2THE ONLY POSITION
3EWELL AND HOWARD COLLIDE
4RETREAT TO CEMETERY HILL
5THE REBELS TAKE THE TOWN
6EWELL HESITATES
14EARLY ATTACKS CEMETERY HILL
15CEMETERY HILLTHE REPULSE
16CULPS HILLJOHNSONS ASSAULT 3 JULY
17THE LAST ATTACKS
18COUNTERATTACKS NEAR SPANGLERS SPRING
193 JULY MOSTLY AFTERNOON
20EPILOGUE
SPANGLERS SPRING

7SLOCUM AND HANCOCK REACH THE FIELD
8GETTING READY FOR FIGHT
9SKIRMISHERS SHARPSHOOTERS AND CIVILIANS
10BRINKERHOFFS RIDGE
11THE ARTILLERY 2 JULY
12BLUNDER ON THE RIGHT
13JOHNSON ATTACKS
TWO CONTROVERSIES
ORDER OF BATTLE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC AND ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA 13 JULY 1863
NOTES
BIBLIOGRAPHY
INDEX
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Harry W. Pfanz is author of Gettysburg--The First Day and Gettysburg--The Second Day. A lieutenant, field artillery, during World War II, he served for ten years as a historian at Gettysburg National Military Park and retired from the position of Chief Historian of the National Park Service in 1981.

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